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Sept. 14, 2020

Agenda_ATCFPB_Special_Meeting_20200914 original pdf

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Versión en español a continuación. Special Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board September 14, 2020 Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board to be held September 14, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance by September 13, 2020 at noon. All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the September 14th Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison, Amanda Rohlich, at Amanda.Rohlich@austintexas.gov no later than noon Sunday, September 13th. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to Amanda.Rohlich@austintexas.gov by noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. •If this meeting is broadcast live, residents may watch the meeting here: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch- atxn-live Reunión del Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board FECHA de la reunion September 14, 2020 La junta se llevará con modificaciones de distanciamiento social Se permitirán comentarios públicos por teléfono; no se permitirá ninguna entrada en persona. Todos los oradores deben registrarse con anticipación (September 13 antes del mediodía). Todos los comentarios públicos se producirán al comienzo de la reunión. Para hablar de forma remota en la reunión, los residentes deben: • Llame o envíe un correo electrónico al enlace de la junta en Amanda.Rohlich@austintexas.gov a más tardar al mediodía (el día antes de la reunión). La información requerida es el nombre del orador, los números de artículo sobre los que desean hablar, si están a favor / en contra / neutrales, y un número de teléfono o dirección de correo electrónico. • Una vez que se haya llamado o enviado por correo electrónico una solicitud para hablar al …

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Sept. 14, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_Climate Equity Plan_Presentation_20200914 original pdf

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2020 Austin Climate Equity Plan September 2020 Summary ● We’ve been updating the Community Climate Plan o Draft for public comment out until September 30 o Council likely November 12 ● What we’re looking for from you: ○ Comments ○ Areas of Interest ○ Pledge of Support How was this plan update created? • 24 City Staff • 120 Community Members (NGO, Govt., Business) • 12 Ambassadors • 4 Equity Trainings • 5 Community Workshops (over 250 attendees) • 14 Steering Committee Meetings • 60+ Advisory Group Meetings • 50+ Interviews by Ambassadors A History of Inequities that Remains Today • The Austin 1928 Master Plan divided the city along racial lines, forcibly displacing Black residents into specific, undesirable areas. • The Tank Farm fuel storage facility, Eastside Landfill, and the Holly Power Plant exposed people of color to toxic pollution in East Austin neighborhoods. • Gentrification is taking place in parts of the city where low-income people and people of color have been forced to live, the African-American share of the Austin population declined from 12% in 1990 to 7.7% in 2010. • As of 2015, 52% of white Austin residents were homeowners, only 27% of African-American and 32% of Hispanic/Latinx residents owned homes. • Cases of COVID-19, hospitalization and mortality rates are disproportionately affecting Latinx and Black communities We are Changing the Earth’s Climate Warming over 2℃could be catastrophic to life on earth Climate Projections for Austin • Low-income communities and communities of color are disproportionately affected by climate hazards • • Experience climate shocks on top of existing economic stressors • Have less resources to bounce back from event Suffer long-term impacts to mental and physical health Our Commitment to Climate Equity Climate Change Eliminate the use of fossil fuels for energy & transportation Health Affordability Accessibility Energy efficiency Renewable energy Less dependence on cars Electric vehicles • • • • • More trees & natural spaces Healthier consumer choices • Cultural Preservation Community Capacity Just Transition Accountability Racial Equity Eliminate disparities that can be predicted by race • • • • • • Safety for all at all times No disproportionate economic outcomes Fair access to services for all Inclusive participation in our city Positive health outcomes for all Embrace culture & difference If we’re not proactively addressing equity, we’re perpetuating injustice. Net-zero by 2050 → Net-zero by 2040 The updated Net-zero by 2040 target has …

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Sept. 14, 2020

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Aug. 10, 2020

Agenda_ATCFPB_20200810_Remote Meeting original pdf

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Special Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board August 10, 2020 Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board to be held August 10, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance by August 9, 2020 at noon. All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the August 10th Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison, Amanda Rohlich, at Amanda.Rohlich@austintexas.gov no later than noon on Sunday, August 9th. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to Amanda.Rohlich@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY FOOD POLICY BOARD MONDAY, AUGUST 10TH FROM 10:00 TO 11:30 AM VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Karen Magid, Chair Andrea Abel Ellen Sweets Ryan Rosshirt Emily Nicola CALL TO ORDER AGENDA Kara Prior, Vice Chair Felipe Camacho Kacey Hanson Sharon Mays Joi Chevalier a. Office of Sustainability: Update on COA Pandemic Food Access Efforts, Edwin Marty, 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM JUNE MEETING 2. STAFF BRIEFINGS Food Policy Manager 3. OLD BUSINESS a. Board Infrastructure & Protocol i. Review Board Members’ meetings with City and County Officials b. Board vacancies and appointments 4. NEW BUSINESS a. Board Annual Report and responsibilities i. Discuss Annual Board Internal Review report ii. Discuss annual strategic planning meeting iii. Discuss vote and take possible action on Board Chair and Vice-Chair Positions b. Update on Community Climate Plan Revision c. Working Group Briefings and Recommendations i. Build Opportunities for Food Entrepreneurs ii. Support Farms & Farmers iii. Healthy Food Access to All Communities iv. COVID-19 Food System Response d. …

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Aug. 10, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_COA Food Access Response to COVID19 original pdf

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City of Austin – Food Access Response to COVID-19 FOOD POLICY MANAGER CITY OF AUSTIN Background •Austin Public Health asked the Office of Sustainability Food Team to take on the food access response to the Pandemic •Emergency Operations Center – Social Services Branch •Utilized existing relationships • Food Access Coordination group  Food Access Task Force •Primary functions: • Coordination • Communications • Funding and Policy Food Access and Emergency Food •Existing barriers to food access exacerbated by pandemic response •Identify and meet immediate needs in priority populations  plan ahead for ongoing needs  keeping ahead of on-going changes to food insecurity •Initiatives: • Food distribution to populations experiencing homelessness (EAT Initiative) • PPE for organizations • Direct distribution to individuals (grocery boxes/prepared meals) • Farmers Market support • Food recovery •Continue tracking emerging food access needs: • Caregiver meals at schools • WIC shopping pilot program Communications •Interagency Task Force communications •EOC reporting structure •United Way/2-1-1 + ConnectATX • Map of food resources •Facilitate connections between organizations Food Access/Food Distribution Models •Keep Austin Together •Neighborhood Pop-Up Grocery Model •Good Apple Policy and Funding •State and federal policy tracking • Federal relief legislation • Changes to SNAP and other nutrition programs • P-EBT outreach •Local funding – OOS, APH, Travis County HHS, All Together ATX •Brief Council members, EOC Social Services Branch, City Management on critical food access needs, funding needs Data Collection Project with UT-SPH and Dell Med Pop Health Anecdotal evidence/understanding of increases in food access needs Purpose: Identify high-need populations (geographic areas, populations, specific barriers, etc.) Planning currently informed by existing data and organizations participating in Food Access Task Force Expanding network, but need to capture full scope of food access barriers and emerging needs Conversations with UT-SPH and with Dell Med Goal: Identify highest-need populations to inform resource allocation and ongoing food access planning What’s next? •Planning for next steps • Extension of emergency feeding programs/funding • How long will the “official” pandemic response last? •Food Policy Board recommendation •Incorporate UT findings into policy and planning work •Regional Food Systems Collaborative •Food systems resilience planning •SNAP Incentive Working Group • Recommendation for HSSC in October

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Aug. 10, 2020

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July 15, 2020

Agenda original pdf

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Special Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board July 15, 2020 Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board to be held July 15, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance by July 14, 2020 at noon. All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the July 15th Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison, Samantha Night, at Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov no later than noon on Tuesday, July 14th. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY FOOD POLICY BOARD WEDNESDAY, JULY 15TH FROM 10:00 TO 11:30 AM VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Karen Magid, Chair Andrea Abel Ellen Sweets Ryan Rosshirt Emily Nicola CALL TO ORDER Kara Prior, Vice Chair Felipe Camacho Kacey Hanson Sharon Mays Joi Chevalier AGENDA 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM JUNE MEETING 2. STAFF BRIEFINGS a. Office of Sustainability: Update on COA Small Business and Nonprofit grant programs 3. OLD BUSINESS a. Board Infrastructure & Protocol i. Review Board Members’ meetings with City and County Officials b. Board vacancies and appointments 4. NEW BUSINESS a. Board Annual Report and responsibilities i. Discuss annual strategic planning meeting ii. Discuss vote and take possible action on Board Chair and Vice-Chair Positions b. Update on Community Climate Plan Revision c. Working Group Briefings and Recommendations i. Build Opportunities for Food Entrepreneurs ii. Support Farms & Farmers iii. Healthy Food Access to All Communities iv. COVID-19 Food System Response d. Review of Board Member Assignments 6. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS ADJOURNMENT …

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June 12, 2020

Agenda_ATCFPB_20200612_Special Called Meeting original pdf

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Special Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board June 12, 2020 8:00 am Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board to be held June 12, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance (June 11th at NOON). All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the June 12th Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison at Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov no later than noon, Thursday June 11th. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY FOOD POLICY BOARD FRIDAY, JUNE 12TH FROM 8:00 TO 9:30 AM VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Karen Magid, Chair Andrea Abel Ellen Sweets Roman Gonzalez Emily Nicola Kara Prior CALL TO ORDER Kara Prior, Vice Chair Felipe Camacho Kacey Hanson Sharon Mays Joi Chevalier Ryan Rosshirt AGENDA 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM MAY MEETING 2. STAFF BRIEFINGS a. Office of Sustainability, update on food access response to COVID-19 b. New staff introductions – Carol Fraser (Economic Development Department), Sari Albornoz (Watershed Protection), Jennifer Steverson (PARD) 3. OLD BUSINESS a. Board Infrastructure & Protocol i. Review Board Members’ meetings with City and County Officials b. Board vacancies and appointments 4. NEW BUSINESS a. Board Annual Report and responsibilities b. Community Climate Plan – food working group recommendations c. Working Group Briefings and Recommendation i. Build Opportunities for Food Entrepreneurs ii. Support Farms & Farmers iii. Food and Climate iv. Healthy Food Access to All Communities i. Discuss and take possible action on recommendations v. COVID-19 Food System Response i. Discuss and …

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June 12, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_20200612_Consumption_Food Goals & Strategies_EquityTool_submitted to SC original pdf

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Equity Tool Our Climate Equity Commitment Racial equity is the condition when race no longer predicts a person’s quality of life outcomes in our community. The City of Austin Climate Plan Revision Process recognizes that racial inequity is wrong and solving climate change is impossible without racial equity. In Austin, this means our Climate Plan Revision Process will only succeed if we center racial equity in the goals, strategies, and plans developed through the Revision Process. We realize that City of Austin infrastructure, policies, and investment have historically and systemically neglected and harmed low-income communities and communities of color. The City acknowledges these injustices and the need to right these wrongs by changing its institutions and creating a culture of equity. We recognize: ● Low-income communities and communities of color are the most impacted by extreme weather, and climate change will worsen existing harms and challenges. ● Low-income communities and communities of color must be prioritized to receive the disproportionate benefits of the transition to a pollution-free society. ● If we design and implement programs to serve low- income communities and communities of color, we will positively impact all residents in the Austin area. Because of this, we have created the following themes and associated Equity Tool with Screening Questions to ensure our climate plan will increase racial equity: Health, Affordability, Accessibility, Just Transition, Community Capacity, Cultural Preservation & Accountability. Objectives Health - Strategy improves health (physical and mental) outcomes for low-income communities and communities of color. The strategy upholds the fundamental human right to clean, healthy and adequate air, water, land, food, education, transportation, safety, and housing. Affordability - Strategy lowers and stabilizes costs related to basic living needs (housing, food, utilities, healthcare, transportation, etc.) for low-income communities and communities of color. Accessibility - Strategy increases access to jobs, housing, transportation, funding, education, healthy foods, and a clean environment for low-income communities and communities of color. Strategy removes barriers through city infrastructure, policy, and investments. Just Transition - Strategy ensures economic justice so that low-income communities and communities of color are prioritized in the benefits of the strategy and are protected from any potential negative consequences. Community Capacity- Strategy elevates the voices of low-income communities and communities of color by developing and strengthening the skills, abilities, and resources that a community needs to survive, adapt, and thrive. Cultural Preservation - Strategy deliberately and respectfully honors cultural relevance and history …

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June 12, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_20200612_Presentation ACCPRevision_Food_WG_GoalsStrategies original pdf

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Food Working Group Goals and Strategies Consumption Advisory Group Austin Community Climate Plan 2020 Revision Background City of Austin – Equity Statement Goals of this Revision Mission Statement To protect and improve Austin’s quality of life now and for future generations by leading efforts to achieve: 1. Net-zero community-wide greenhouse gas emissions 2. A healthy & just local food system 3. A climate resilient and adaptive city Process overview and schedule What’s new in the revision Last Time Refresh ● Eye on the prize: community-wide net- zero carbon by 2050 ● Alignment with other plans ● Co-created with staff and community leadership ● Equity focus ● Smaller number of high-impact actions ● Refined topic areas ● New consumption-based emissions lens ● Formal integration of natural systems and carbon sequestration ● Shared responsibility to reach beyond City-controlled activities Process overview and schedule Structure Large Institutions Working Group Steering Committee Transportation Electrification AG Transportation and Land Use AG Sustainable Buildings AG Consumption Natural Systems AG AG Community Climate Ambassadors Going Forward The Next 5 Months July - REVIEWS August - Boards and Commissions Review and Public Comment September - Finalization and take to Council for Approval June - Full 1st Draft of the Plan May 2020 Jun 2020 Jul 2020 Aug 2020 Sep 2020 ID Goals & Strategies Draft Plan Plan Finalization Consumption: Food Advisory Groups Goal Areas for all 5 Sections of the Plan Sustainable Buildings • Building Materials • Energy • Water • Refrigerants Transportation and Land Use • • • • • • Increase Transit Ridership Increase People Powered Transit Right to Stay / Return Affordable Housing Transit Oriented Development Access to Open Space Transportation Electrification Consumption of Goods • • • Vehicle Adoption Charging Infrastructure Emerging Issues • • • Food Consumer Goods Institutional Purchasing Natural Systems • Natural Lands • Private Property • Working Lands • Public Urban Landscapes Advisory Groups Food Working Group Members Lisa Barden • • Molly Costigan • Jennifer Cregar • Ricardo Guerrero • Christine Jovanovic • Kat Lopez • Madison Matteus • • • Ona McGovern • Samantha Night • Amanda Rohlich Karen Magid Cavan Merski Goal GOAL 1 (Pro-climate, Pro-Health Food System) By 2030, ensure 100% of Austinites, with a focus on the food insecure, can access a pro-climate, pro-health food system built for equity and resilience. A pro-climate, pro-health food system is community-driven, prioritizes regenerative agriculture, supports dietary and health …

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Backup_ATCFPB_20200612Consumption_Food Goals & Strategies_submitted to SC original pdf

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Please fill out this template for your group topic’s proposed goal and strategies. Completion deadline: May 29 Proposed goal (Example: Achieve X by 2030): Please make the goal as specific as possible, and worded in active voice. It must also be measurable and achievable by 2030. Keep it to 1-2 sentences. By 2030, ensure 100% of Austinites, with a focus on the food insecure, can access a pro-climate, pro-health food system built for equity and resilience. A pro-climate, pro-health food system is community-driven, prioritizes regenerative agriculture, supports dietary and health agency, prefers plant-based over animal-based foods, and minimizes food waste. Community-driven means located in, initiated, led, and evaluated by low-income communities and communities of color, with explicit mechanisms for soliciting community input, developing within-community leaders, and sharing outcomes within and outside the community. Goal translated into GHG impact: (Example: X metric tons CO2e by 2030) TBD with Cavan’s assistance Advisory Group: Consumption Topic Area: Food How will this goal be measured or quantified? The goal needs to be quantifiable, but doesn’t have to be carbon-quantifiable. Metrics for goal and each strategy: Goal measure(s): ● Rate of food insecurity in Austin ● TBD measures of availability and access ● Organic food waste in landfill ● Consumption measures of plant-based foods Strategy 1 measure(s): Strategy 2 measure(s): Strategy 3 measure(s): Strategy 4 measure(s): ● Dollar amount of institutional purchasing of pro-health, pro-climate foods ● Dollar amount and allocation of funding, reported by community and race/ethnicity of fund recipients ● Number of food solutions funded ● Availability and accessibility of pro-climate, pro-health food (measure TBD) ● Proportion of pro-climate, pro-health food choices available at food retail outlets ● Number of programs/tools developed and implemented ● Number of people accessing programs/tools Strategy 5 measure(s): ● Amount of organic food waste as measured by waste management organizations Proposed strategies to meet goal: Please list 3-5 actionable strategies that are achievable by 2025. These need to be as concise as possible, and worded in active voice. 1-3 sentences max per strategy. Strategy 1: Apply a purchasing framework, support supply-chain infrastructure, and build a regional food system network to bolster institutional and corporate food procurement of pro-climate, pro-health options. Strategy 2: Increase the availability and accessibility of pro-climate and pro-health foods through community-driven food solutions by providing and equitably allocating funding sufficient to reach the goal of full access for all. Strategy 3: Implement community-driven programs to …

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June 12, 2020

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June 12, 2020

20200612_4.c.v.i: COVID-19 Food System Response Recommendation original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Austin Travis County Food Policy Board Recommendation Number: 20200612-4.c.v.i COVID-19 Food System Response Recommendation The COVID-19 pandemic, the related shutdown, and the human toll experienced disproportionately by Black and Indigenous communities, and People of Color (BIPOC) expose the legacy and ongoing entrenchment of racial injustice in our food and economic systems. Austin faces a historical and pivotal moment as we uncover the stark contrasts related to resources and the racialized structures that form what we now call our “food system.” The contrasts begin with the creation of a system of food production on land first taken from Indigenous peoples and later taken from Black farmers. A racialized system has created White wealth through policies, practices, laws and policing, and granted unequal access to capital and profit in the food system through the exploitation, enslavement and death, primarily of Black people. On that same spectrum, throughout our history and today, Latinx workers and immigrants of color who have always performed “essential” food system work are underpaid, exposed to dangerous and unstable working conditions, harassment and economic instability. BIPOC workers in the food system are also disproportionately unable to afford good food. Locally, clear contrasts revealed through COVID-19 include a woefully under-resourced and undeveloped food system in terms of planning, resiliency and coordination. Food workers have either been laid-off and then return to back-of-house low-paid jobs in restaurants and food businesses with insufficient personal protective equipment (PPE), or they have continued to work throughout the pandemic on farms and in grocery stores, risking exposure without paid sick leave, while corporations have prospered from the heightened demand for food-related staples. Statewide, primarily Latinx meatpacking workers experienced a large outbreak of coronavirus infection with little immediate testing or support. Infection, hospitalization, and death rates from COVID-19 in our region have also skewed disproportionately Latinx. This is not an accident, but at least partly is a result of our racialized food system that produces inequitable and devastating impacts for the BIPOC in our region. As significant funding shifts are considered in local budgets, we must invest sufficient resources to understand, dismantle and remake our food system into one that is economically and racially just and puts the workers and small businesses who have been negatively impacted at the center of the process throughout. This includes food access as a right (the end of food insecurity). This is not easy to do. It requires …

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June 12, 2020

Approved Minutes_ATCFPB_20200612 original pdf

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MEETING MINUTES June 12, 2020 Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board The Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board (ATCFPB) convened on Friday, June 12, 2020 VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch-atxn-live Board Members in Attendance: Andrea Abel, Felipe Camacho, Joi Chevalier, Kacey Hanson, Kara Prior (Vice-Chair), Karen Magid (Chair), Ryan Rosshirt, Sharon Mays, Ellen Sweets (joined at 8:27 am) Absent board members: Emily De Maria Staff in Attendance: Edwin Marty, Sam Night, Amanda Rohlich CALL TO ORDER Board Chair Karen Magid called the meeting to order at 8:07 am CITIZEN COMMUNICATION: GENERAL a. Errol Schweizer – speaking to Black Lives Matter and the overfunding of APD and underfunding of food and community services. APD most deadly force in Texas. Recommends 1) Support for RISE fund, housing, Austin Public Health 2) Support for the COVID-19 working group of the food policy board recommendations, 3) b. Paula McDermott -- 42% of ACC students were experiencing food insecurity pre-pandemic. Importance of student meals which drops off after graduations from high school. Calling attention to the racialized food system. Volunteers can’t do this work anymore; the City needs to invest in food systems. c. Mokshika Sharma – program director of Keep Austin Together, an effort to provide prepared meals with private and public (County) funds. By end of June, will have provided over 50,000 meals. This service was developed as a response to the pandemic but highlighted the need for this service to continue. d. Jodi Lane – adopt critical needs of immediate support but also look to fund long term support with Regional Food System Planning and a Food System support office. e. Farah Rivera – CEO of Serafina. Speaking to the permitting requirement for charitable feeding organization. Asking board to help remove requirements. f. Max Elliott – Speaking to the racialized food system that has been highlighted in the recent pandemic. Need for a Department of Food Justice to address the issues of the food system. We need big investments to create a truly just food system. 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM MAY 11th MEETING Board Member Joi Chevalier motioned to approve the meeting minutes from May 11, 2020, with Board Sharon Mays seconding the motion. Passed on a 8-0 vote. The City of Austin is committed to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Reasonable modifications and equal access to communications will be provided upon request. Meeting locations are planned with wheelchair access. If requiring Sign …

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May 11, 2020

Agenda_ATCFPB_20200511_RemoteMeeting original pdf

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Special Meeting of the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board May 11, 2020 Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting to be held May 11, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance (by Sunday, May 10th at noon). All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison at 713-824-7335 or Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov no later than noon, Sunday May 10th. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to Samantha.Night@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. AUSTIN-TRAVIS COUNTY FOOD POLICY BOARD MONDAY, MAY 11TH FROM 1:00 TO 2:30 PM VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING Kara Prior, Vice Chair Felipe Camacho Kacey Hanson Sharon Mays Joi Chevalier Ryan Rosshirt AGENDA CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Karen Magid, Chair Andrea Abel Ellen Sweets Roman Gonzalez Emily Nicola Kara Prior CALL TO ORDER 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 2. OLD BUSINESS a. Board Infrastructure & Protocol i. Review Board Members’ meetings with City and County Officials 3. NEW BUSINESS a. Working Group Briefings and Recommendation i. Build Opportunities for Food Entrepreneurs ii. Support Farms & Farmers iii. Food and Climate iv. Healthy Food Access to All Communities i. Discuss and take possible action on recommendations v. Food and Gardens vi. COVID-19 Food System Response i. Discuss and take possible action on recommendations vii. Review of Board Member Assignments FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS ADJOURNMENT The City of Austin is committed to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Reasonable modifications and equal access to communications will be provided upon request. Meeting locations are planned with wheelchair access. If …

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May 11, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_DRAFT Emergency ATCFPB COVID-19 Food System Response original pdf

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DRAFT ATCFPB COVID-19 Food System Response - emergency/short-term responses The document with the mid- to long-range policy and budget requests have been separated out to focus the requests on different time-scales. The other document can be found here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zBuK3yHR_1VSD9wFb1PNf3n7h24o6Q-cgPdgZSKAMQc/edit? usp=sharing NOTE: Thank you for your time contributing to this document. Since we are working to have as many voices add to this document as possible, please do not delete verbiage or suggestions. Please use strikethrough (Format -> Type -> Strikethrough) to add comments, suggest edits, and particularly removal/edits of ideas or change to “Suggesting” from “Editing” which is the equivalent to track changes . The COVID-19 outbreak and the responses implemented to mitigate its further spread are disrupting every part of our local food system. Nearly all aspects of the food system from producers, retailers, processors, restaurants, schools, emergency food agencies, and other businesses and institutions have had to transform the way they operate, in many cases shutting down. Most are losing revenue and opportunities that will prevent them from recovering. Food system workers have lost jobs in record numbers, and a number of those jobs will not be available when the crisis lifts. Every household has had to adapt as well, as access to food has become limited and inconsistent, particularly for those already struggling with food insecurity. 1 The Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board works to advocate for a robust, resilient local food system. We have worked to compile this response and recommendations based on the issues and concerns that are being highlighted in the current pandemic circumstances, as well as recommendations and best practices from a variety of stakeholders and other sources to address impact being felt throughout our local food sector. This list is not complete. Given the on-going nature and uncertain duration of this crisis, new and unpredicted issues will continue to come to light. Additionally, with time for analysis when we have emerged from emergency circumstances, more action will be required. However, we have a generational opportunity to use this time of crisis and reflection to bring to life a vision of nourishment and planetary health for all. Every action taken to prevent the further spread of COVID-19, feed people during this crisis, and support and rebuild food system businesses and institutions must include a commitment to ensuring racial and economic equity and recognize that food access is essential to justice. Communities of color, …

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May 11, 2020

Backup_ATCFPB_Revised ATCFPB Food Access Recommendation original pdf

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Building on the Austin/Travis County Food Policy Board’s (ATCFPB) commitment to strengthening economic vitality, social equity and natural resource protection in our local food system, the Healthy Food Access Working Group (WG) of the ATCFPB chose to prioritize creating processes and tools that center equity in our regional food system. April 13, 2020 PROPOSAL WHEREAS: • The City of Austin (CoA) with regional food system stakeholders participated in a two- day facilitated workshop that explored Food Systems Inequities in the U.S. and Central Texas: Root Causes and Historical Analysis and concluded that those negatively impacted must be involved in all decision-making processes in order to authentically center equity; • Communities of color, low-income, and rural populations are most negatively impacted by the existing food system due to systemic racism and structural inequity and face the greatest barriers to accessing healthy, affordable foods, as well as economic opportunity; • Before COVID-19, more than 1 in 6 Central Texas residents were food insecure, and 20.1% of Travis County residents experienced food insecurity in 2017; • A comprehensive Central Texas Food Regional Food Plan that centers equity aligns with the City and Travis County economic, social, and environmental priorities; • Regional food planning helps integrate the many major local planning functions such as land use, economic development, transportation, environmental sustainability and resilience, parks and recreation, public safety, health and human services, and agricultural preservation; • The timing of an equity-centered Central Texas Regional Food Plan supported by the CoA and Travis County will impact and integrate with planning processes and policy priorities already underway such as the Austin Community Climate Plan and the Land Development Code Revision; • The CoA with public, private, and community partnerships has invested in critical food system-related initiatives that provide a foundation for a regional food plan including: the Good Food Purchasing Program, a comprehensive Food Environment Analysis, a state and local food system-related policy scan, mapping and protocols for urban agriculture on public lands, updated permitting processes for food production, markets and emergency relief, and investment in food access initiatives with multiplier effects for the local economy (e.g., SNAP enrollment, mobile markets) • Total sales for food retail sector in the Capital Area was nearly $7.6 billion in 2015; • Opportunities for federal and state grant funding may be contingent on a demonstrated commitment at the local level via match funds. THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT: The …

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May 11, 2020

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May 11, 2020

Approved Minutes_ATCFPB_20200511 original pdf

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MEETING MINUTES MAY 11, 2020 Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board The Austin-Travis County Food Policy Board (ATCFPB) convened on Wednesday, May 11, 2020 VIA VIDEOCONFERENCING http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch-atxn-live Board Members in Attendance: Andrea Abel, Felipe Camacho, Joi Chevalier, Emily DeMaria, Kacey Hanson, Kara Prior (Vice-Chair), Karen Magid (Chair), Ryan Rosshirt Absent board members: Roman Gonzalez, Ellen Sweets, Sharon Mays Staff in Attendance: Emily Ackland, Edwin Marty, Sam Night, Amanda Rohlich CALL TO ORDER Board Chair Karen Magid called the meeting to order at 1:05 pm. CITIZEN COMMUNICATION: GENERAL a. Paula McDermott. Suggestion to ask for staffing and funding to meet the great needs to address food system needs highlighted through the COVID-19 pandemic. 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM APRIL 15th MEETING Board Member Kara Prior motioned to approve the meeting minutes from April 15, 2020 pending discussed edits, with Board Member Kacey Hanson seconding the motion. Passed on a 7-0 vote. 2. OLD BUSINESS a. Board Infrastructure & Protocol i. Review Board Members’ meetings with City and County Officials i. Karen Magid has a phone call with Sherri Flemming from Travis County to provide update and discuss general funding related to Keep Austin Together 3. NEW BUSINESS a. Working Group Briefings and Recommendation i. ii. iii. iv. Build Opportunities for Food Entrepreneurs – no updates Support Farms & Farmers – Felipe reported that there was no meeting and nothing to report. Met with Noel Trotsky about Travis County planning. Food and Climate – Office of Sustainability created webinar presentation. Karen will share with full board for review. Food and Gardens – no updates The City of Austin is committed to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Reasonable modifications and equal access to communications will be provided upon request. Meeting locations are planned with wheelchair access. If requiring Sign Language Interpreters or alternative formats, please give notice at least 2 days (48 hours) before the meeting date. Please call Edwin Marty, Office of Sustainability at 512-974-2120, for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. For more information on the Food Policy Board please contact Edwin Marty at 512-974-2120 v. Healthy Food Access to All Communities – Kacey Hanson shared that no updates have been made to the recommendation since the April meeting. The recommendation is ready for board action. Board Member Joi Chevalier joined the meeting at 1:30 pm Board Member Emily de Maria left the meeting at 1:45 …

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May 11, 2020

20200511-3.a.iv.i: Funding for Food and Equity original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Austin Travis County Food Policy Board Recommendation Number: 20200511 – 3.a.iv.i_Funding for Food and Equity WHEREAS, The City of Austin (CoA) with regional food system stakeholders participated in a two‐day facilitated workshop that explored Food Systems Inequities in the U.S. and Central Texas: Root Causes and Historical Analysis and concluded that those negatively impacted must be involved in all decision‐ making processes in order to authentically center equity; WHEREAS, Communities of color, low‐income, and rural populations are most negatively impacted by the existing food system due to systemic racism and structural inequity and face the greatest barriers to accessing healthy, affordable foods, as well as economic opportunity; WHEREAS, Before COVID‐19, more than 1 in 6 Central Texas residents were food insecure, and 20.1% of Travis County residents experienced food insecurity in 2017; WHEREAS, A comprehensive Central Texas Food Regional Food Plan that centers on equity aligns with the City and Travis County economic, social, and environmental priorities; WHEREAS, Regional food planning helps integrate the many major local planning functions such as land use, economic development, transportation, environmental sustainability and resilience, parks and recreation, public safety, health and human services, and agricultural preservation; WHEREAS, the timing of an equity‐centered Central Texas Regional Food Plan supported by the CoA and Travis County will impact and integrate with planning processes and policy priorities already underway such as the Austin Community Climate Plan and the Land Development Code Revision; WHEREAS, The CoA with public, private, and community partnerships has invested in critical food system‐related initiatives that provide a foundation for a regional food plan including: the Good Food Purchasing Program, a comprehensive Food Environment Analysis, a state and local food system‐related public policy scan, mapping and protocols for urban agriculture on public lands, updated permitting processes for food production, markets and emergency relief, and investment in food access initiatives with multiplier effects for the local economy (e.g., SNAP enrollment, mobile markets) WHEREAS, Total sales for food retail sector in the Capital Area was nearly $7.6 billion in 2015; WHEREAS, Opportunities for federal and state grant funding may be contingent on a demonstrated commitment at the local level via match funds. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Austin Travis County Food Policy Board recommends that the City of Austin and Travis County support and fund the convening of community partners led by a Community Advisory Board, made up of community members impacted …

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