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Aug. 23, 2022

Item 3. El Buen Samaritano original pdf

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Dr. Rosamaria Murillo Chief Executive Officer August 23, 2022 WHY Meet Camila...she represents the past and future of Latinos The house she holds out to us is a symbol of the contributions of Latinos to this country ---we build homes, universities, communities, we are the builders of the future – we are the teachers, nurses, doctors, ingenieros, constructores, economistas, matematicos. Camila She is our reminder of the work ahead of us She is our hope She is our vision She is our builder We hold ourselves accountable to her….and ask you to join us Together, we will work, lead, walk 1000 miles to our last breath for her wellbeing – this nation depends on her power and her wellbeing….SHE IS the future of our nation – SHE IS the future of this community. Call to action: Equity in funding calls for expansion of opportunities and creation of more choices, so we all thrive. El Buen Samaritano A community where everyone is welcomed, enjoys a sense of belonging, and has full opportunity to reach their highest potential....a community where we all thrive. HEALTH, EDUCATION, ESSENTIAL SERVICES Our Services (March 2020-present) Food Access - 40,000 individuals • Drive-thru food pantry • Partner home delivery • Mobile/pop-up pantries • Community garden Health Access & Referrals • Coordinated Care Network • Women's health and family planning • Adolescent health • COVID-19 vaccines, Education, Outreach Phase 1: 1,300 vaccinated Phase 2: 2,639 vaccinated to date Equity Impact Data • Urban institute • Robert Wood Johnson • St. David’s Foundation Youth Services - 300 youth • Youth Academic Center of Excellence Out of school time services • Summer Camps • Intergenerational Programming Adult Education 600 & CHW Workforce Development 200 • ESL classes • Digital Literacy classes • CHW Workforce Development • LEAD* (Latinas Education Advancement & Development ) • Economic Assistance – 7 Million • Financial Assistance • Rent Assistance • Tenant Stabilization Equity & Impact Equitable access to services across Central Texas • • • This map represents our equity and access efforts— highlighting El Buen’s services footprint. It tells a story about the distance individuals travel to access services as well as how deep we can reach community through partnerships. El Buen's partners are essential to expanding services throughout Central Texas. The majority of El Buen’s clients come from the Eastern Crescent (east of I-35 corridor) to access our services: food, financial & …

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Aug. 23, 2022

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July 26, 2022

Agenda original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation by telephone. To register to speak remotely: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Daniela Silva, District 1 Dulce Castañeda, District 10 AGENDA Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 Ivanna Neri, District 4 District 9 - Vacant CALL TO ORDER PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Each speaker will have three minutes to address their concerns regarding items not posted on the agenda. Speakers wishing to address an agenda item will have the chance to do so when the agenda item is called. APPROVAL OF MEETING MINUTES 1. Approve the minutes of the Hispanic/Latino Quality of Life Commission regular meeting held on June 28, 2022. STAFF BRIEFINGS 2. Staff briefing regarding key findings and recommendations from Small and Minority Business Resources’ Disparity Report. Presented by Edward Campos, Director. DISCUSSION AND ACTION ITEMS 3. Presentation by representatives from Tesla and discussion and possible action regarding workforce equity, infrastructure needs, community partnerships, and environmental justice. Presenters include Walt Gonzalez, Brooke Kintz, Teresa Grant, and Logan Grant. WORKING GROUP UPDATES, DISCUSSION, AND ACTION ITEMS 4. Health Work Group (Commissioner Garay) – related to COVID-19 5. Representatives to Joint Inclusion Committee (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) - related to latest JIC discussion and activity 6. Representatives to Commission on Seniors (Commissioner Solis) – related to issues relevant to older adults in the Hispanic/Latino community 7. Budget and Policy Priorities Work Group (Chair Afifi, Vice-Chair Vigil, & Commissioners Peña, Silva, and Perales) – related to the City Manager’s …

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July 26, 2022

Agenda Addendum original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, JULY 26, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation by telephone. To register to speak remotely: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Daniela Silva, District 1 Dulce Castañeda, District 10 AGENDA ADDENDUM Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 Ivanna Neri, District 4 District 9 - Vacant DISCUSSION AND ACTION ITEMS 4. Presentation by representatives from Tesla Outreach Community Alliance (TOCA) and discussion and possible action regarding community asks and concerns. The City of Austin is committed to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Reasonable modifications and equal access to communications will be provided upon request. Meeting locations are planned with wheelchair access. If requiring Sign Language Interpreters or alternative formats, please give notice at least 2 days (48 hours) before the meeting date. Please call Amanda Jasso at City of Austin Equity Office at 512-974-9107 for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. For more information on the Hispanic/Latino Quality of Life Resource Advisory Commission please contact Amanda Jasso at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov

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July 26, 2022

Item 2. Disparity Study - Small & Minority Business Resources Department original pdf

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City of Austin Small and Minority Business Resources Overview 2022 Disparity Study Edward Campos, Director, SMBR Tamela Saldana, Ph.D., Assistant Director, SMBR Objectives Background Disparity Study Purpose and Objectives Quantitative & Qualitative Analysis Key Findings Study Recommendations Next Steps City of Austin | SMBR 2 Background • Jan. 2020 – Colette Holt & Associates (CHA) was contracted to conduct the 2022 Disparity Study • April 2020 – Two virtual Public Kick-off webinars were held • 2020 – Launched disparity study website and e-mail account City of Austin | SMBR 3 Disparity Study Purpose and Objectives • Complies with constitutional mandate to regularly review evidence supporting race- and gender-based programs • Provides a legal defense if the programs are challenged • Develops accurate data for annual and contract goal setting • Gathers feedback for program improvements City of Austin | SMBR 4 Quantitative Analysis CHA analyzed the following information: FY 2013 – FY 2018 contract data files 4,741 contract records -1,069 contracts were analyzed for the sample file -*96 % Prime and Subcontractor validation of contract files SMBR’s MBE/WBE Program; and Financial Services Departments’ (Purchasing, Capital Contracting), Public Works’ and Economic Development’s processes and procedures More than 75 documents and information resources City of Austin | SMBR 5 Study Contract Data Contract Type Total Contracts Prime Contracts Subcontracts TOTAL 1,002 842 1,844 Share of Total Contracts 54.3% 45.7% 100.0% Final Contract Data File Net Dollar Value Business Type Total Contract Dollars Prime Contracts $826,453,073.73 $249,783,337.28 Subcontracts Share of Total Contract Dollars 76.8% 23.2% Source: CHA analysis of City of Austin data City of Austin | SMBR 6 Distribution of Contract Dollars Distribution of Contract Dollars by Race and Gender (total dollars) MBE Asian Native American NAICS Black Hispanic White Women M/WBE Total Non- M/WBE TOTAL $15,368,481 $51,392,913 $17,411,303 $754,775 $84,927,473 $60,325,355 $145,252,828 $747,078,317 $892,331,145 Distribution of Contract Dollars by Race and Gender (share of total dollars) Native American White Women MBE Asian NAICS Black Hispanic M/WBE Total Non- M/WBE TOTAL 1.7% 5.8% 2.0% 0.1% 9.5% 6.8% 16.3% 83.7% 100.% Source: CHA analysis of City of Austin data City of Austin | SMBR 7 Weighted Availability Aggregated Weighted Availability for City Contracts Black Hispanic 1.5% 4.7% Asian 1.4% Native American 0.4% MBE 8.0% White Women 6.5% MBE/WBE 14.4% Non- MBE/WBE 85.6% Total 100.0% Source: CHA analysis of City of Austin data City of Austin | SMBR 8 Disparity Ratios Black 118.0% Disparity …

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Item 3. Presentation from Tesla, Inc. original pdf

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C I T Y O F A U S T I N H I S P A N I C / L A T I N O Q U A L I T Y O F L I F E R E S O U R C E A D V I S O R Y C O M M I S S I O N J U L Y 2 6 , 2 0 2 2 O U R M I S S I O N Accelerate the world’s transition to sustainable energy G I G A F A C T O R Y T E X A S F O O T P R I N T October 2020 January 2021 July 2022 G I G A F A C T O R Y T E X A S C O M M U N I T Y I N V E S T M E N T $2.7 Billion of Real and Business Property 3,500+ Employees (82% Travis County Residents) $50.6 Million paid to HUBs G I G A F A C T O R Y T E X A S C O M M U N I T Y I N V E S T M E N T / O U T R E A C H AISD Eastside Vertical Team American Youth Works Austin Area Urban League Austin Community Foundation Austin Partners in Education Austin Voices for Education and Youth Austin’s Colony HOA Black Leaders Collective Boys and Girls Club Breakthrough Central Texas Central Texas Food Bank Community Advancement Network Communities in Schools E4 Youth EcoRise Girlstart Goodwill Latinitas Latinas in Tech PODER Prado HOA TAAP TOCA Workforce Solutions Capital Area G I G A F A C T O R Y T E X A S C O M M U N I T Y I N V E S T M E N T Financial investment in Del Valle ISD to support: • Deputy Chief Educational Workforce Development • Program Manager of Workforce Readiness • High School Robotics Instructor G I G A F A C T O R Y T E X A S C O M M U N I T Y I N V E S T M E N T Tesla Signing Day 2022 Tesla Sponsored Austin Community College Partnership 72 High School Graduates Entered Manufacturing Development Program …

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July 26, 2022

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June 28, 2022

Agenda original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation. To register: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). AGENDA CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Daniela Silva, District 1 Dulce Castañeda, District 10 CALL TO ORDER PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Each speaker will have three minutes to speak Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 District 4 – Vacant District 9 - Vacant 1. APPROVAL OF MAY MEETING MINUTES 2. NEW BUSINESS – The Commission may discuss and make recommendations on the following: a. Welcome Commissioner Dulce Castañeda, representative for District 10. b. Austin Public Health’s Community Health Worker Hub, presented by Laura LaFuente, Interim Assistant Director. c. Economic Development Department and Hotel Occupancy Tax (HOT) Funded Programs, presented by Meghan Wells, Cultural Arts Division Manager; Erica Shamaly, Music and Entertainment Division Manager; and Melissa Alvarado, Heritage Tourism Division Manager. d. Capital Metro’s two potential new fare programs: fare capping and Equifare, a new discounted fare category. e. Tesla Gigafactory and community concerns 3. OLD BUSINESS Discussion and possible action: a. Health Work Group (Commissioner Garay) b. Representatives to Joint Inclusion Committee (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) c. Representatives to Commission on Seniors (Commissioner Solis) d. Budget and Policy Priorities Work Group (Chair Afifi, Vice-Chair Vigil, & Commissioners Peña, Silva, and Perales) e. Education and Youth Mental Health Work Group (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) f. Reimagining Public Safety Work Group (Chair Afifi and Commissioner Peña) g. Arts and Culture Work Group (Chair Afifi) h. Strategic Initiatives and HLQOL Report (Vice-Chair Vigil, Chair Afifi, and Commissioners Garay, …

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June 28, 2022

Item 2b. Community Health Worker Hub Overview - Austin Public Health original pdf

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Overview of the Community Health Worker Hub June 28, 2022 LAURA G. LA FUENTE – INTERIM ASSISTANT DIRECTOR LISA BLACKWELL - PROGRAM SUPERVISOR Community Health Worker “A community health worker is a frontline public health worker who is a trusted member of and/or has an unusually close understanding of the community served. This trusting relationship enables the worker to serve as a liaison/link/intermediary between health/social services and the community to facilitate access to services and improve the quality and cultural competence of service delivery.” The Path to the Hub 2019 – Request for Career Ladder Progression for Community Health Worker (CHW) Family. 2019/2020 – Internal plans developed to launch a CHW HUB 2021 – Reimagining Public Safety Taskforce Public Health Recommendations August 2021 – Community Health Worker titles within the City of Austin. August 2021 - $500,000 in one-time funding for the creation of the CHW Network and Training. March 2022 – Austin Public Health approved for a certification training program for Community Health Workers. Community Health Worker and Community Health Worker Instructor Community Health Worker (CHW) • Liaison and trusted messenger • Advocates • Connects Community Health Worker Instructor (CHW-I) Trains other CHWs • 160 hr certification • Continuing Education course (CEU) Certification for Community Health Workers Who can be a Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) Certified Community Health Worker?  Texas resident  16 yrs. old +  Training • Class Instruction – Completion 160-hour approved class instruction OR • Experience – At least 1000 hrs. of CHW experience CHW Core Competencies Communication Skills Interpersonal Skills Service Coordination Skills Capacity-Building Skills Advocacy Skills Teaching Skills Organizational Skills Knowledge Base on Specific Health Issues Training for CHW Certification Option 1 - Class Instruction Option 2 - Experience • Approved DSHS training program • 160 hours • Virtual and In-person learning options OR • 1000 cumulative hours of community health work services • Within last three (3) years. • Experience verified with the supervisor(s) noted in the application. • Virtual Class – Tuesday & Thursdays, 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm • In-Person – Saturdays, 9:00 am – 3:00 pm • May 21st – September 10th Class Set Up • 2 cohorts Current Enrollment • Virtual – 21 • In-person – 19 Marketing Staffing • Current APH Instructors • Staffing Challenges 160 hr. training course • Word-of-Mouth from APH CHW Instructors • Promo Flyer • Total sign-ups for classes …

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Item 2c. Hotel Occupancy Tax (HOT) Funded Programs - Economic Development Department original pdf

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FY23 Cultural Funding Programs Update CITY OF AUSTIN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT JUNE 28, 2022 Concerns of Inequitable Distribution* Problem: we are trying to address 50 years of inequitable distribution of funding through the Cultural Funding programs due to the historical policies, practices, and (in)accessibility of our programs. *Data shows leadership/staff demographics FY15-FY 21 only. We recognize this is only one indicator. Equitable Funding Review Goal The desired goal is to sustain and grow Austin’s cultural infrastructure so that all may share in the economic and employment benefits of the heritage preservation and creative sectors, as well as upholding the City’s commitment to racial equity per the City of Austin’s Equity Office standards and goals. Cultural Funding Review Process Phase 1 Phase 2 Phase 3 Phase 4 Phase 4.5 Launch + Listen Record + Analyze Equity Audit 9 1 0 2 • 1 town hall • 2 workshops • 39 listening sessions • 540 participants • 1,160 engagement hours • Feedback compiled and synthesized • Organized into specific themes and directions for further discussion • Staff assessment of programs • Equity trainings for staff and commissions • Heritage Tourism and Music and Entertainment added • Process audit with ODD • MJR Recommendations Program Development • 1500+ hours of staff planning • 2 public presentations • Feedback: comment box, 1:1 meetings, Q+A, direct communications, Commission meetings 2 0 2 2 Program Refinement • 1 presentation • Regular VOOH and 3 guided discussions • Arts Commission chats • Feedback collection including survey • Feedback will be used to refine the program before official launch • Evaluation is ongoing! Feedback informed every aspect of program development including program priorities, application scoring, rubrics, and process improvements. Holistic Funding Ecosystem Nexus Nurture new and emerging applicants by funding creative public projects developed through community activation and/or collaboration. Elevate Creative and administrative expenses of cultural producers that amplify equity and prioritize inclusive programming. Thrive Focused investment to sustain and grow arts organizations that are deeply rooted in, and reflective of Austin’s diverse cultures. Pilot Program Nexus in Detail Goal Contract Term Type of Funding Who can apply? Selection Process Draft Total Available Funds Draft Award Amounts Draft Number of Awardees Individuals/ Groups* (*cooperatives, non-profit organizations, businesses, partnerships, etc.) Encourage new talent Nexus 6 Months Project Funding Only 3 COA Staff + Rubric ~$500,000 $5,000 100 (50 per cycle; 2 cycles/year) Pilot Program Elevate in Detail Elevate Elevate …

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Item 2d. Capital Metro fare capping and Equifare original pdf

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Potential Fare Programs Hispanic/Latino Quality of Life Resource Advisory Commission | June 28, 2022 Agency Core Values INNOVATION EQUITY SUSTAINABILITY TRANSPARENCY SAFETY 2 Agenda • Fare Strategy Review • Potential Fare Programs powered by Amp • Fare Capping • Equifare • Title VI Analysis • Community Engagement • Next Steps 3 Fare Strategy Review Addresses transit affordability and other population needs (i.e., low income and per Title VI, race, color, etc.) Incorporates alternative fare structures (e.g., capped fares for all riders) Supports equity in future fare adjustments in alignment with Project Connect Integrated Financial Model Equity CapMetro Fare Strategy Technology Encourages increased ridership while maintaining sustainable revenue stream Maintains and creates programs for various demographics (e.g., senior citizens, military, employer- sponsored, ILAs) Encourages contactless payments, other innovations and integrations 4 CapMetro wants to make our fares more equitable. We know that our customers pay for their transit passes one trip at a time instead of taking advantage of the savings that come with day or monthly passes. Proposed Fare Programs powered by Amp Fare Capping Equifare Fare capping limits how much you pay for all your trips in a day, week or month. An additional discounted fare category for income-eligible customers 5 What is Fare Capping? Fare capping limits how much you pay for all your trips in a day, week or month. Fare capping makes sure that customers: • Never pay more than the total cost of a Day Pass in a calendar day • Never pay more than the total cost of a monthly pass in a calendar month 6 Here's how fare capping works on MetroBus: When you pay for 2 single rides in one day, you earn a Daily Cap and ride free the rest of the day. Your daily spending is capped at $2.50 total! 7 Fare Capping - Monthly Cap When you pay for 33 single rides in a calendar month, you earn a Monthly Cap, and ride free the rest of the month. • Your monthly spending is capped at $41.25 total! • Monthly Cap • 33 Paid Rides • 17 Days of Riding • Benefit: ride free up to 14 days per calendar month 8 How to Get Fare Capping: Amp Account • Get Amp, by physical card or CapMetro App • Load money to your account - this is called stored value! • Tap your card or scan your app to …

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June 28, 2022

Item 2e. Letter from Tesla Outreach Community Alliance (TOCA) original pdf

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To: Elon Musk 1 Tesla Road Austin, TX 78725 June 14, 2022 Communities Request Dialogue and Partnership from Tesla towards Sustainable Development in Del Valle Given that: Tesla’s arrival in 2020 – with significant tax abatements – was met with community optimism that the company would provide high quality jobs for residents of southeastern Travis County, along with many other hoped-for community benefits. Given that: Tesla has rapidly constructed one of the nation’s largest car factories east of Austin, adjacent to communities of color that have historically endured environmental injustices, making dialogue with Tesla’s neighbors all the more necessary. Given that: Tesla needs to have frequent and sufficient contact with the community most impacted by their project, and expectations that the company go beyond the limited requirements of their economic incentive deal with Travis County. THEREFORE, to address community concerns, we propose a series of public meetings with Tesla, in collaboration with Travis County and the City of Austin—in order to ultimately reach a written “contract with the community” that would help guide the company as it makes plans for corporate social responsibility programs in the future. Our coalition of groups, as the Tesla Outreach Community Alliance (or TOCA), has begun this process by laying out the following list of potential efforts we hope that Tesla would undertake, divided into four categories: On Labor • Develop plans to hire otherwise qualified people living near the plant who need language training or other language accommodations On Partnership • Develop plans – including job fairs – to hire people who do not have access to web recruiting tools • Improve plans to hire otherwise qualified people who are reentering from the criminal legal system • Establish a Community Advisory Panel of neighbors and grassroots groups • Report regular status updates to the public on the progress towards these community needs • Fund anti-displacement programs to support neighboring communities On the Environment On Infrastructure of Austin • Improve protection of water quality from stormwater runoff and hazardous waste, and ensure air quality is not degraded • Develop an ecological conservation and restoration plan for Tesla’s riverfront property, and plans for a community park • Enhance measures to mitigate flood risk for downstream communities • Help fund the extension of water and sewer pipelines to connect nearby neighborhoods to utility service from the City • Commit to the completion of the Harold Green Road …

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May 24, 2022

Agenda original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, MAY 24, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation. To register: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). AGENDA CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Daniela Silva, District 1 CALL TO ORDER PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Each speaker will have three minutes to speak Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 District 4 - Vacant District 9 - Vacant District 10 - Vacant 1. APPROVAL OF FEBRUARY, MARCH, and APRIL MEETING MINUTES 2. PUBLIC BRIEFINGS a. Environmental Justice and Tesla Factory – update on community letter. Presenters from PODER (People Organized in Defense of Earth and her Resources). 3. STAFF BRIEFINGS a. City’s fist comprehensive Food Plan – Update on proposed planning process. Presenters: Edwin Marty, Food Policy Manager, Sustainability Office; Sergio Torres, Food and Resilience Coordinator, Sustainability Office. 4. NEW BUSINESS a. Discussion and possible action regarding Commission vacancies. b. Discussion and possible action regarding working group planning. 5. OLD BUSINESS Discussion and possible action: a. Economic Development and Access to Affordable Housing work group (Vacant) b. Health Work Group (Commissioner Garay) c. Representatives to Joint Inclusion Committee (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) d. Representatives to Commission on Seniors (Commissioner Solis) e. Budget and Policy Priorities Work Group (Chair Afifi, Vice-Chair Vigil, and Commissioners Peña, Silva, and Perales) f. COVID-19 Work Group (Vacant) g. Education Work Group (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) h. Public Safety Work Group (Chair Afifi and Commissioner Peña) i. Arts and Culture Work Group (Chair Afifi) j. Strategic Initiatives and HLQOL Report (Vice-Chair Vigil, Chair Afifi, and Commissioners Garay, Perales, and Solis) …

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2a. Environmental Justice and Tesla original pdf

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People Organized in Defense of Earth and Her Resources May 18, 2022 To: Mayor Adler and the Austin City Council 301 W. 2nd St Austin, TX 78701 URGENT: City Should Withhold Tesla Permits Until Community Demands Are Met PODER, the Texas Anti-Poverty Project (TAPP), Hornsby Bend Alliance and the local groups listed below demand that the City of Austin delay granting any further permits to Tesla until the company agrees to certain conditions regarding community engagement, environmental protection, and water access. These conditions can be negotiated through dialogue with the City of Austin, Travis County, Tesla, and appropriate community liaisons. Right now, Tesla is planning to build – in addition to their 4.2 million square foot car factory – a toxic battery cathode plant along the Colorado River, near neighborhoods that do not have access to satisfactory, affordable water, while the company is planning to receive vast amounts of water from the City of Austin for its industrial operations. We are counting on you, our representatives, to hold the company accountable to the public interest before further harm is done to communities and the environment. To date, Tesla has failed to meaningfully engage nearby residents, and elected leaders have not applied enough pressure to bring the company to the table. Two years ago, Tesla was offered tens of millions of public dollars in tax breaks from neighboring jurisdictions to come here. The signed agreements and pronouncements allude to many possible community benefits but lack specificity or enforcement provisions. Since 2020, we note that the company has cleared swaths of trees, moved mountains of dirt, filled in ponds, and poured over 100 contiguous acres of concrete for its factory, with apparently no priority given to the creation of a promised “ecological paradise” on the riverfronti. Public officials as well as neighbors have been left scratching their heads wondering whether the company will live up to any of its verbal commitments, or continue to operate with little regard to social or environmental responsibility. The Tesla factory is yet another disturbing example of environmental injustice on the east side of Austin, following a longstanding pattern of polluting industrial projects being concentrated near low-income communities of color, disregarding the negative impacts on human and environmental health. Austin in recent years has ostensibly become committed to pursuing equity and justice, as evidenced by the 2016 creation of the city’s Equity Officeii– whose motto is “Critical …

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3a. Comprehensive Food Plan original pdf

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A Food Plan for Austin Developing the City’s first-ever Food Plan What is a Food System ? The Office of Sustain ability defin es the food system as an interconnected network that in cludes ev ery thing that happen s w ith food —w here an d how it is grow n , dis tributed an d s old, con s um ed, an d ideally recov ered. T he food s y s tem is s haped by its s tak eholders , practices , an d the law s that regulate both. Post Consumption & Waste Diversion Processing & Distribution Production Food Justice Consumption & Access Markets & Retail Did you k n ow ? ● 14.7% Food In security in Travis Coun ty an d 18 out of 47 zip codes in Travis Coun ty don ’t have a full service grocery store ● 16.8 acres of farm lan d are lost every day in Travis ● Less than 1% of food con sum ed in Austin -Travis Coun ty is locally produced ● 1.24 m illion poun ds of food is w asted every day in Coun ty Austin When disaster strik es ● Lack of supplies and no organized m eans of distribution w hat they need ● Road conditions can prevent people from getting ● Support services closed ● Long lines and bare shelves ● Em ergency supplies lack food that m eets culture and dietary needs Disaster Food & Water Appen dix ● Work in g w ith Hom elan d Security & Em ergency M an agem ent (HSEM ) an d other departm en ts ● Creatin g a plan to supplem en t the Em ergency Operation s Plan ● Will in clude learnings from Win ter Storm Uri, COVID-19, boil w ater n otices, an d other possible scen arios Developin g Austin ’s firs t ev er F ood P lan Why do w e n eed a Food Plan ? ● The im pact of the Covid-19 pandem ic & Winter Storm Uri exposed and exacerbated deficiencies in our food system . ● A Food Plan w ill set clear Goals and Str ategies to m itigate the im pact of future cris es , correct the s y s tem ’s in equalities , an d m ov es tow ard a m ore equitable, s …

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May 24, 2022

Draft Minutes - April original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, APRIL 26, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation. To register: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Daniela Silva, District 1 CALL TO ORDER Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 District 4 - Vacant District 9 - Vacant District 10 - Vacant Draft Minutes Chair Afifi Called the Meeting to Order at 5:38pm Board Members in Attendance: Chair Amanda Afifi, Vice Chair Sharon Vigil, Daniela Silva, Maria Solis, Jesus Perales, Felicia Peña, Ricardo Garay PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Each speaker will have three minutes to speak: Amanda Carrillo – Resident who lives on McCall Lane talked about the effects of the jet fuel tank being built on City property 430 feet from the residents. Resident indicates they were never notified, and no environmental justice impact survey was conducted. Predominately Spanish speaking neighborhood. This threatens the health of all the residents. 1. APPROVAL OF FEBRUARY AND MARCH MEETING MINUTES Postponed to next month. 2. PUBLIC BRIEFINGS a. Early Childhood Services – Briefing on American Rescue Plan Act funds for early childhood investments and pending unmet needs. Presenter: Cathy McHorse, Success by 6, United Way 3. STAFF BRIEFINGS a. Palm District Planning Update – Update on draft vision framework for the plan. Presenter: Stevie Greathouse - Housing and Planning Department 4. NEW BUSINESS the Commission a. Introduction from Assistant City Manager Veronica Briseño, Executive Sponsor to b. Discussion and possible action regarding Commission elections for Chair and Vice Chair. i. Chair: Vice Chair Vigil moved to nominate Amanda Afifi as Chair. …

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May 24, 2022

Draft Minutes - February original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22, 2022 AT 5:30 PM PERMITTING AND DEVELOPMENT CENTER - ROOM 1203 6310 WILHELMINA DELCO DR, AUSTIN, TX 78752 Hybrid – In person and Virtual Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation. To register: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Zaira R. Garcia, District 4 Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 Daniela Silva, District 1 District 10 – Vacant District 9 - Vacant DRAFT MINUTES CALL TO ORDER - Chair Afifi called the meeting to order at 5:53pm. Board Members in Attendance: Chair Amanda Afifi, Vice Chair Sharon Vigil, Ricardo Garay, Felicia Peña, Maria Solis, Jesus Perales, Daniela Silva PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL - none Each speaker will have three minutes to speak 1. APPROVAL OF JANUARY MEETING MINUTES 2. STAFF BRIEFING a. Intergovernmental Relations Office – Overview of 87th Legislative Session & three special sessions, with legislation passed that impacts City of Austin. Presenter: Brie L. Franco, Intergovernmental Relations Officer 3. STAFF BRIEFINGS a. American Gateways – Overview of outcomes and successes related to legal services and partnership with the City. Presenter: Natalia Drelichman, Co-Director of Programs and Operations 4. NEW BUSINESS a. Discussion – Welcome Commissioner Silva, District 1 b. Discussion and possible action regarding budget engagement forums. – no action taken 5. OLD BUSINESS Discussion and possible action: a. Economic Development and Access to Affordable Housing work group (Commissioner Garcia) – no new updates b. Health Work Group (Commissioner Garay) – no new updates c. Representatives to Joint Inclusion Committee (Chair Afifi and Vice-Chair Vigil) – no new updates d. Representatives to Commission on Seniors (Commissioner Solis) – no new updates e. Budget and Policy …

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May 24, 2022

Draft Minutes - March original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING OF THE HISPANIC/LATINO QUALITY OF LIFE RESOURCE ADVISORY COMMISSION TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 2022 AT 5:30 PM AUSTIN CITY HALL – BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS ROOM 1101 301 W 2ND St, AUSTIN, TX 78701 Hybrid – In person and Virtual Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely by telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation. To register: Call or email the board liaison at Amanda.Jasso@austintexas.gov or 512-974-9107. The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on if applicable, email address and telephone number (must be the same number that will be used to call into the meeting). CURRENT BOARD MEMBERS: Amanda Afifi, District 2, Chair Sharon Vigil, District 7, Vice-Chair Ricardo Garay, District 3 Jesus Perales, District 8 Zaira R. Garcia, District 4 Maria C. Solis, District 5 Felicia Peña, Mayor Sandy Ramirez, District 6 Daniela Silva, District 1 District 10 – Vacant District 9 - Vacant DRAFT MINUTES CALL TO ORDER - Chair Afifi called the meeting to order at 5:50pm. Board Members in Attendance: Chair Amanda Afifi, Vice Chair Sharon Vigil, Ricardo Garay, Sandy Ramirez, Maria Solis, Jesus Perales, Daniela Silva PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Each speaker will have three minutes to speak summer program Gavino Fernandez and Luis Acosta - El Concilio de East Austin, high school and college Postponed until April meeting 1. APPROVAL OF FEBRUARY MEETING MINUTES 2. STAFF BRIEFING a. Equity-Based Historic Preservation Plan – Update to plan that will replace Austin’s 1981 preservation plan with an inclusive, equity-focused, and community-oriented process and outcome. Presenters: Cara Bertron and Elizabeth Brummett, Housing and Planning Department b. FY 22-23 Action Plan – Briefing and discussion on upcoming spending priorities for federal housing and community development grants as part of Community Needs Assessment for the FY 22023 Action Plan. Presenters: Mandy DeMayo and Katie Horstman, Housing and Planning Department c. Body-worn and Dashboard Cameras – Briefing from Office of Police Oversight on public information and engagement campaign related to APD’s current body-worn camera and dashboard camera program and rules. Presenter: Karla Peredo, Office of Police Oversight 3. NEW BUSINESS a. Discussion and possible action regarding FY 2022-2023 …

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May 24, 2022

Updated 3a. Comprehensive Food Plan original pdf

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A Food Plan for Austin Developing the City’s first-ever Food Plan What is a Food System ? The Office of Sustain ability defin es the food system as an interconnected network that in cludes ev ery thing that happen s w ith food —w here an d how it is grow n , dis tributed an d s old, con s um ed, an d ideally recov ered. T he food s y s tem is s haped by its s tak eholders , practices , an d the law s that regulate both. Post Consumption & Waste Diversion Processing & Distribution Production Food Justice Consumption & Access Markets & Retail Did you k n ow ? ● 14.7% food in security in Travis Coun ty an d 18 out of 47 zip codes in Travis Coun ty don ’t have a full service grocery store ● 16.8 acres of farm lan d are lost every day in Travis ● Less than 1% of food con sum ed in Austin -Travis Coun ty is locally produced ● 1.24 m illion poun ds of food is w asted every day in Coun ty Austin When disaster strik es ● Lack of supplies and lim ited organized m eans of distribution w hat they need ● Road conditions can prevent people from getting ● Support services closed ● Long lines and bare shelves ● Em ergency supplies lack food that m eets culture and dietary needs Disaster Food & Water Appen dix ● Work in g w ith Hom elan d Security & Em ergency M an agem ent (HSEM ) an d other departm en ts ● Creatin g a plan to supplem en t the Em ergency Operation s Plan ● Will in clude learnings from Win ter Storm Uri, COVID-19, boil w ater n otices, an d other possible scen arios Developin g Austin ’s firs t ev er F ood P lan Why do w e n eed a Food Plan ? ● The im pact of the Covid-19 pandem ic & Winter Storm Uri exposed and exacerbated deficiencies in our food system . ● A Food Plan w ill set clear Goals and Str ategies to m itigate the im pact of future cris es , correct the s y s tem ’s in equalities , an d m ov e tow ard a m ore equitable, …

Scraped at: May 24, 2022, 9 p.m.