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Nov. 14, 2022

13 Draft Proposed Commission Meeting Schedule for 2023 original pdf

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Belinda Hare for Animal Advisory Commission 2023 Proposed Meeting Schedule Animal Advisory Commission Proposed Meeting Schedule, 2023 The City of Austin’s Animal Advisory Commission meets on the second Monday of every month, 6 p.m.: • Monday, January 9 • Monday, February 13 • Monday, March 13 • Monday, April 10 • Monday, May 8 • Monday, June 12 • Monday, July 10 • Monday, August 14 • Monday, September 11 • Monday, November 13 • Monday, December 11 • Monday, October 9 (Indigenous peoples’ day)

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9 City's Use of Cooling Centers During Heat Waves original pdf

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Animal Advisory Commission November 14, 2022, Meeting City’s Use of Cooling Centers In response to Commissioner Smagula’s questions about the City of Austin’s use of cooling centers during extreme heat events, Bill Wilson, Emergency Management Manager, City of Austin’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM), and Mark Sloat, Animal Services Office (ASO), shared the following: Bill Wilson, City of Austin’s Homeland Security and Emergency Management (HSEM): Only service animals are permitted in cooling centers per City ordinance No. 20190307-014 relating to recreation centers and Council approved Library Use Rules. It is the recommendation of the Parks and Recreation Department (PARD) and Austin Public Library (APL) that pets, which include all small animals, continue to not be permitted in those respective facilities to mitigate safety and sanitation risks. Regularly scheduled activities continue during cooling center activations putting all guests at risk when pets are present in a facility not designed for accommodating a variety of small animals. HSEM coordinates with the Austin Animal Center (AAC) during emergencies and can mobilize cooling trucks for pets as needed and if trucks and staff are available. Advertising the resource is not advisable because AAC is burdened by overcrowding, which means fulfilling requests for additional services further strains their already tight resources. Cooling center staff are aware of the resource and can request the service when they observe the need. Fortunately, AAC has been able to accommodate on the few occasions a cooling truck has been requested for on-site service. AAC also regularly performs outreach by checking on pets and providing direct assistance to pets and their owners experiencing homelessness. I also noticed that you are asking about services during an emergency shelter, but the subject for the email relates to cooling centers. I wanted to take a moment to differentiate between the two. Emergency Shelters will operate on a 24-hour basis and provide food, sleep accommodations, and other services for those that need the use of the shelter. Cooling Centers are locations that people can go to during the heat of the day to cool down. While there are times that snacks and water are provided, they are not open overnight and therefore do not provide sleeping accommodations, other services, or 24-hour access. We do work to provide accommodations for pets during both sheltering and cooling center operations. Mark Sloat, Program Manager, Animal Services Office (ASO): “We had no issues during the summer with …

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Agenda original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING of the ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMISSION NOVEMBER 14, 2022, 6 P.M. AUSTIN CITY HALL, Room 1101 301 W. Second St. AUSTIN, TEXAS 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference. The meeting may be viewed online at: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch-atxn-live Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely via telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation by telephone. To register to speak remotely, call or email Stephanie Hall, by Sunday noon, November 13, at 512-974-2210, or stephanie.hall@austintexas.gov. CURRENT COMMISSIONERS Craig Nazor, Chair Nancy Nemer Palmer Neuhaus Jo Anne Norton Luis Herrera Kristen Hassen, Parliamentarian Dr. Amanda Bruce AGENDA CALL TO ORDER PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL Ryan Clinton, Vice Chair Lisa Mitchell Katie Jarl Lotta Smagula Beatriz Dulzaides Dr. Paige Nilson The first 10 speakers signed up prior to the meeting being called to order will each be allowed a three-minute allotment to address their concerns regarding items not posted on the agenda. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 1. Approve the minutes of the Animal Advisory Commission Regular Meeting on October 10, 2022. STAFF BRIEFINGS DISCUSSION ITEMS 2. Austin Animal Center and Animal Services Monthly Report. 3. Presentation of the Monthly Report by Austin Pets Alive! DISCUSSION AND ACTION ITEMS 4. Approve a Recommendation to Council concerning the City of Austin's upcoming Five- 5. Approve the creation of a working group regarding spay/neuter efforts within the Year Strategic Plan. community. 6. Approve the creation of a working group to evaluate and discuss the current state of reports and published literature related to the housing of dogs in Travis County animal shelters. 7. Approve Commission Annual Meeting Schedule for 2023. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS ADJOURNMENT The City of Austin is committed to compliance with the American with Disabilities Act. Reasonable modifications and equal access to communications will be provided upon request. Meeting locations are planned with wheelchair access. If requiring Sign Language Interpreters or alternative formats, please give notice at least two days (48 hours) before the meeting date. Please contact Stephanie Hall, Office of the City Clerk, 512-974-2210 or at Stephanie.Hall@austintexas.gov, for additional information; TTY users route through Relay Texas at 711. For more information on the Animal Advisory Commission, please contact Stephanie Hall at 512-974-2210 or Stephanie.Hall@austintexas.gov

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Draft Minutes original pdf

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AAC Meeting Minutes 2022-10-10 ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMISSION REGULAR MEETING DRAFT MINUTES October 10, 2022 The Animal Advisory Commission convened for a regular meeting on Monday, October 10, 2022, 6 p.m., in the Boards and Commissions Room 1101 at Austin City Hall. Commission Chair, Craig Nazor, called the meeting to order at 6:12 p.m., conducted a roll call of members and confirmed a quorum of seven commissioners. Five Commissioners attended the meeting in person: Nazor, Norton, Dulzaides, Dr. Nilson and Dr Amanda Bruce. Two Commissioners attended via teleconferencing, Commissioners Nemer and Jarl. Six members were absent, including Commissioners Smagula, Clinton, Herrera, Mitchell, Neuhaus, and Hassen. Commission Members Absent: Commissioners Smagula, Clinton, Herrera, Mitchell, Neuhaus, and Hassen. Staff in Attendance: Don Bland, Jason Garza PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS: GENERAL In-person: Amber Rowland Neil Hay APPROVAL OF MINUTES 1. Corrections to the draft minutes were noted. Commissioner Nemer moved to approve the minutes with corrections; Commissioner Jarl seconded the motion which passed unanimously with all participating Commissioners voting in favor, 7 to 0: Six members were absent, including Commissioners Smagula, Clinton, Herrera, Mitchell, Neuhaus, and Hassen. 1 AAC Meeting Minutes 2022-10-10 BRIEFINGS DISCUSSION ITEMS 2. Austin Animal Center and Animal Services Reports 3. AAC Staffing and Services 4. Update on ASO Audit, Keith Salas, Assistant City Auditor 5. Presentation by Parliamentarian regarding Roberts Rules of Order 6. Presentation by Austin Pets Alive! regarding APA! Monthly Report DISCUSSION AND ACTION ITEMS 7. Discussion and Possible Action Concerning the Congress Avenue Bridge Bat Colony Commissioner Dr. Nilson moved to approve the six recommendations presented by Dr. Merlin Tuttle, Bat Conservancy, to City Council. Commissioner Dulzaides seconded the motion which passed unanimously, 7-0, with the seven commissioners in attendance voting in favor, including Nazor, Norton, Dulzaides, Dr. Nilson, Dr Bruce, Nemer and Jarl. Six members were absent, including Commissioners Smagula, Clinton, Herrera, Mitchell, Neuhaus, and Hassen. 8. Discussion and Possible Action on Adopting Bird-Safe Building Ordinances Dr. Chris Sheppard, Director of the Glass Collisions Program at the American Bird Conservancy, presented on the importance of protecting birds and how to reduce bird collisions. Commissioner Norton moved to recommend the City Council adopt the American Bird Conservancy’s Model-Friendly Building Guidelines. Dr. Nilson seconded the motion which passed unanimously, 7-0, with the seven commissioners in attendance voting in favor, including Nazor, Norton, Dulzaides, Dr. Nilson, Dr Bruce, Nemer and Jarl. Six members were absent, including Commissioners Smagula, Clinton, Herrera, Mitchell, …

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Item 2 - Animal Services Report original pdf

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October 2022 October 2022 Animal Services Report AUSTIN ANIMAL SERVICES REPORT Animal Services News • The live outcome rate for October was 97.86 percent. • A total of 853 animals were brought to the shelter which included 490 dogs, 327 cats, 24 wild animals, six guinea pigs, five rabbits, and one tortoise. • A total of 453 animals were adopted (234 cats, 209 dogs, and 8 small pets). • A total of 93 dogs, cats, tortoise, and snake were returned to their owners (RTOs and RTO-Adopt). • Animal Protection Officers (APOs) returned 63 animals to their owners in the field. • Officers handed out 35 fencing assistance applications and implanted eight microchips. • Officers impounded 143 injured animals and delivered 165 wildlife animals to Austin Wildlife Rescue. • Officers entered 202 rabies exposure reports and submitted 28 specimens for rabies testing. Eight bats tested positive for rabies, five were non-negative (not able to test). • 36 total coyote related activities • Out of 36 coyote related activities, 23 fell within the reported behavior types (sighting, encounter, incident, and • Encounters: Pets were a factor in 100% of activities: o 1 encounter involved a coyote running at caller and small pet twice, entering the fenced backyard one Incidents: Pets were factor in 100% of these encounters. • o 1 incident involved a coyote “trying to catch the neighbor’s dog”. Unable to make contact. Animal Protection o 21 sightings o 5 wild speaks o 4 wild sicks o 4 wild injured o 1 incident o 1 encounter observation). time October 2022 Animal Services Report • Out of 36 related activities, 14 fell within the reported behavior types (wild sick, wild speak, and wild injured) Volunteer, Foster, and Rescue Programs • A total of 323 volunteers donated 4,747 hours of volunteer service. • The Volunteer Coordinators held seven orientations for new volunteers, introducing 226 people to the shelter programs. 121 new volunteers attended their first training or mentor shifts in September. • 148 individuals donated 296 hours towards dog walking and cat care through group volunteer service. • 13 Community Service Restitution individuals performed 116 hours of laundry, dishes, and other duties as assigned. • 111 animals were adopted directly from foster care. • More than 200 different people/families fostered. • 78 new foster applications were processed. (This number does not necessarily include walk-in / in person applications that were processed.) • There …

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Item 2 - Data Report original pdf

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Animal Services Office Statistical Report – October 2020-2022 October 2022 Intake October 2021 Intakes October 2020 Intakes October 2022 Adoptions October 2021 Adoptions October 2020 Adoptions October 2022 RTOs October 2021 RTOs October 2020 RTOs October 2022 Animals Euthanized October 2021 Animals Euthanized October 2020 Animals Euthanized October 2022 Total Live Release Rate October 2021 Total Live Release Rate October 2020 Total Live Release Rate October 2022 Animal Vaccinations October 2021 Animal Vaccinations October 2020 Animal Vaccinations October 2022 Spayed/Neutered at AAC October 2021 Spayed/Neutered at AAC October 2020 Spayed/Neutered at AAC October 2022 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster October 2021 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster October 2020 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster October 2022 Animals Transferred: October 2021 Animals Transferred October 2020 Animals Transferred October 2022 Animal Lost, Stolen or Missing October 2021 Animals Lost, Stolen or Missing October 2020 Animals Lost, Stolen or Missing October 2022 SNR Program October 2021 SNR Program October 2020 SNR Program October 2022 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO October 2021 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO October 2020 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO

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Item 2 - Vacancy Report original pdf

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Animal Services Regular Positions - November 8, 2022 Department Administration Position Chief Animal Services Officer Deputy Chief Animal Services Officer Department Executive Assistant Human Resources Coordinator Administrative Supervisor Administrative Senior Administrative Assistant Manager - Vet Services Program Manager II - Animal Care, Behavior & Enrichment Program Manager II - Field Services, Pet Resource Center, Outreach Program Manager II - Customer Service, Rescue, Foster, Volunteer Program Manager I - Marketing & Communication Marketing Representative Supervisor Animal Care Specialist (Lead) Animal Care Animal Care Technician Animal Care Worker PCN 104136 105962 110660 104084 110581 106431 102392 105961 105863 114415 104128 113310 114417 106424 110591 106435 106440 106447 115773 114564 115776 106443 106421 106426 106428 106429 106430 106432 106433 106437 114216 114672 115772 Status Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Animal Protection Supervisor Animal Protection Senior (Lead) Dangerous & Vicious Dog Investigator Neglect & Resource Officer Severe Bodily Injury Investigator Wildlife Officer - City Wildlife Officer - County Animal Protection Officer Behavior & Enrichment Supervisor Animal Enrichment Specialist 115774 115775 115777 115778 106445 111614 116982 105510 104132 104129 113859 104123 112867 117369 104122 104125 104130 104133 105294 105340 110375 110376 112866 116981 104132 115660 115661 116438 116439 116440 New position 118687 New position 118688 106439 104124 115409 115771 Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT VACANT VACANT Filled Filled Filled Customer Service Supervisor Customer Care Representative Senior (Lead) Customer Care Representative Outreach Customer Care Representative - Part Time Public Health Educator I Pet Resource Center Supervisor Public Health Educator I Customer Care Representative Senior (Lead) Customer Care Representative Foster/Volunteer Rescue/Transport Vet Services Foster Coordinator Foster Coordinator - Part Time Foster Coordinator Rescue Coordinator Transport Coordinator Supervisor Animal Health Technician Lead 106438 111105 106460 106446 104139 110900 106434 106436 106442 104140 106441 114670 107502 113503 113454 118481 104131 114416 111312 106444 104134 106425 106427 106459 New position 118683 New position 118684 New position 118685 New position 118686 110598 114565 104138 114669 111309 106448 104126 106451 Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled Filled VACANT Filled Filled VACANT VACANT VACANT VACANT …

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Item 3 - License Agreement Report original pdf

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Monthly Report on License Agreements 2022 - 10 October This report is in agreement with the terms outlined in Section 8.4 of the License Agreement between the City of Austin and Austin Pets Alive! with a focus on APA!’s impact on Travis county through our partnership with Austin Animal Center. Summary: Austin Pets Alive! (APA!) continues to be the city of Austin’s largest partner in lifesaving. APA! takes animals that have medical and behavioral issues that require a higher cost per animal than the average healthy animal in care. APA! focuses on these animals in an effort to have a measurable effect on the live release rate at AAC. APA! Intakes transferred from AAC: 168 animals were transferred out of AAC to rescue partners in October. 81 of those were transferred to APA!, and another 17 animals were born in APA!’s care to pregnant animals sent from AAC. Additionally, APA! took in 51 pets directly from owners within Travis county through the PASS program that may have otherwise entered AAC. AAC - Cat Behavior AAC - Cat Bottle Baby AAC - Cat Maternity AAC - Cat Medical AAC - Cat Space AAC - Dog Behavior Large/Medium AAC - Dog Behavior Small AAC - Dog Bottle Baby AAC - Dog Maternity AAC - Dog Medical AAC - Dog Parvo Transfer AAC - Dog Space Large/Medium AAC - Dog Space Small TOTAL DIRECT AAC - Cat BIC AAC - Dog BIC TOTAL AAC Travis - PASS 0 20 0 12 0 5 0 6 13 10 15 0 0 81 0 17 98 49 12 Travis - Parvo OS/PASS TOTAL TRAVIS 159 1 of 8 © 2022 Austin Pets Alive! All Rights Reserved Operations Comparison APA and AAC serve the community in tandem and our combined efforts impact the live release rate across the city, county and surrounding areas. For October 2022: AAC APA! TOTAL Intake 825 833 1,658 S/N at the Shelter 410 608 1018 In Foster* Adoptions 235 1,001 1,236 443 788 1,231 *Single day snapshot 11/7/22 APA! Transfers from AAC as % of AAC Intakes APA must: (a) select a sufficient number of animals from the At-Risk List so that at the end of each year of the Term APA will have selected from the At-Risk List 12% of the total number of animals taken in by AAS during the preceding year. Total AAC Dog and Cat Intake FY22 …

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Item 4 original pdf

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Item 4 - Letter to Austin CM and CFO concerning SD28 Dear City Manager Spencer Cronk and Chief Financial Officer Ed Van Eenoo: We recommend that the City of Austin include information about our many programs for Austin citizens and their companion animals, as well as all of Austin’s valuable and iconic wildlife, in the upcoming Strategic Development 28 Plan (SD28). The Animal Advisory Commission, as well as Austin Animal Center leadership and staff, were disappointed when no mention was made of Austin’s many programs for helping Austin’s animals in the last Strategic Development Plan. There is a tremendous amount of hard work done every day of the year for the animals of Austin by Shelter Staff, supported by the hard work of many Austin citizens who volunteer their time and donate their money to help make the lives of Austin’s companion and wild animals better. This extends out to our many Austin governmental organizations, such as APD, and all of our partner non-profits, all of whom contribute to our goal of the best No-Kill Shelter in the world. It is an unfortunate omission that such hard work on such an important City function is lacking from a Strategic Plan for our City. Animals are family to many Austin residents, and to others, Austin’s wildlife is simply a part of home. Let us be more inclusive in the upcoming Austin Strategic Plan! Thank you for your attention to this matter.

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Recommendation 20221114-004: Letter to Austin City Manager and Chief Financial Officer Concerning SD28 original pdf

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Date: November 14, 2022 Recommendation: ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION 20221114-004 Subject: Letter to Austin City Manager and Chief Financial Officer Concerning SD28 Motioned By: Commissioner Norton Seconded By: Commissioner Herrera Dear City Manager Spencer Cronk and Chief Financial Officer Ed Van Eenoo: We recommend that the City of Austin include information about our many programs for The Animal Advisory Commission, as well as Austin Animal Center leadership and staff, were Austin citizens and their companion animals, as well as all of Austin’s valuable and iconic wildlife, in the upcoming Strategic Development 28 Plan (SD28). disappointed when no mention was made of Austin’s many programs for helping Austin’s animals in the last Strategic Development Plan. There is a tremendous amount of hard work done every day of the year for the animals of Austin by Shelter Staff, supported by the hard work of many Austin citizens who volunteer their time and donate their money to help make the lives of Austin’s companion and wild animals better. This extends out to our many Austin governmental organizations, such as APD, and all of our partner non-profits, all of whom contribute to our goal of the best No-Kill Shelter in the nation. It is an unfortunate omission that such hard work on such an important City function is lacking from a Strategic Plan for our City. Animals are family to many Austin residents, and to others, Austin’s wildlife is simply a part of home. Let us be more inclusive in the upcoming Austin Strategic Plan! Thank you for your attention to this matter. Description of Recommendation to Council: That the City of Austin include information about Austin Animal center’s many programs for Austin citizens, their companion animals, and Austin wildlife in the upcoming Strategic Development 28 Plan (SD28). That the Strategic Development 28 Plan (SD28) be as inclusive as possible. Rationale: Vote: For: 8 Against: 0 Abstain: 3 Absent: 2 1 of 2 Attest: 2 of 2

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Oct. 10, 2022

Approved Agenda October 10 2022 original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING of the ANIMAL ADVISORY COMMISSION OCTOBER 10, 2022, 6 P.M. AUSTIN CITY HALL, Room 1101 301 W. Second St. AUSTIN, TEXAS 78701 Some members of the Commission may be participating by videoconference. The meeting may be viewed online at: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch-atxn-live Public comment will be allowed in-person or remotely via telephone. Speakers may only register to speak on an item once either in-person or remotely and will be allowed up to three minutes to provide their comments. Registration no later than noon the day before the meeting is required for remote participation by telephone. To register to speak remotely, call or email Belinda Hare, by Sunday noon, October 9, at phone 512-978-0565, or email Belinda.hare@austintexas.gov. Please know emails work best. CURRENT COMMISSIONERS Craig Nazor, Chair Nancy Nemer Palmer Neuhaus Jo Anne Norton Luis Herrera Kristen Hassen, Parliamentarian Dr. Amanda Bruce CALL TO ORDER PUBLIC COMMUNICATION: GENERAL AGENDA Ryan Clinton, Vice Chair Lisa Mitchell Katie Jarl Lotta Smagula Beatriz Dulzaides Dr. Paige Nilson The first 10 speakers signed up prior to the meeting being called to order will each be allowed a three-minute allotment to address their concerns regarding items not posted on the agenda. Speakers for specific agenda items may sign up prior to the meeting or in person at the meeting. APPROVAL OF MINUTES 1. Approve the minutes of the Animal Advisory Commission Regular Meeting on September 12, 2022. STAFF BRIEFINGS 2. Presentation by Don Bland and/or Jason Garza regarding Austin Animal Center and Animal Services Reports 3. Presentation by Don Bland regarding AAC Staffing and Services 4. Update on Animal Services Audit, by Keith Salas, Assistant City Auditor DISCUSSION ITEMS 5. Presentation by Parliamentarian regarding Roberts Rules of Order 6. Presentation by Austin Pets Alive! regarding Monthly Report DISCUSSION AND ACTION ITEMS 7. Discussion and Possible Action Concerning the Congress Avenue Bridge Bat Colony, presentation by Dr. Merlin Tuttle, Bat Conservancy 8. Discussion and Possible Action on Adopting Bird-Safe Building Ordinances, presentation by Dr. Chris Sheppard, the Director of the Glass Collisions Program at the American Bird Conservancy 9. Discussion and Possible Action on AAC Monthly Reporting of Data 10. Discussion and Possible Action on Transferring Austin Animal Center Animals to Other 11. Discussion and Possible Action on Inclusion of Animal Services in the City of Austin Communities next Five-Year Strategic Plan 12. Discussion and Possible Action on City’s Use of Cooling Centers 13. Discussion and Possible …

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2 AAC Data Report Sept 2022 original pdf

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Animal Services Office Statistical Report – September2020-2022 September2022 Intake September2021 Intakes September2020 Intakes September2022 Adoptions September2021 Adoptions September2020 Adoptions September2022 RTOs September2021 RTOs September2020 RTOs September2022 Animals Euthanized September2021 Animals Euthanized September2020 Animals Euthanized September2022 Total Live Release Rate September2021 Total Live Release Rate September2020 Total Live Release Rate September2022 Animal Vaccinations September2021 Animal Vaccinations September2020 Animal Vaccinations September2022 Spayed/Neutered at AAC September2021 Spayed/Neutered at AAC September2020 Spayed/Neutered at AAC September2022 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster September2021 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster September2020 Animal Deaths at AAC/Foster September2022 Animals Transferred: September2021 Animals Transferred September2020 Animals Transferred September 2022 Animal Lost, Stolen or Missing September 2021 Animals Lost, Stolen or Missing September 2020 Animals Lost, Stolen or Missing September2022 SNR Program September2021 SNR Program September2020 SNR Program September2022 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO September2021 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO September2020 Intact Animals Adopted/RTO

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2 Flood Plain and TLAC original pdf

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ORCHARDSTWALSH STW CESAR CHAVEZ STCESARCHAVEZWBTORESERVRAMPW 4TH STRESERVERDCopyright nearmap 201503 October 2022 mabrycThis product is for informational purposesand may not have been prepared for orbe suitable for legal, engineering, orsurveying purposes. It does not representan on-the-ground survey and represents onlythe approximate relative location of propertyboundaries. This product has been producedby the Parks and Recreation Departmentfor the sole purpose of geographic reference.No warranty is made by the City of Austinregarding specific accuracy or completeness.u54LLOTu031LLOT¨063POOL¨1POOLa381a092¨17SAXET!"#53u092LLOTAustin Pets Alive! at Volma Overton Sr Beach01020Feet:Austin Pets Alive!100 Year FloodplainPark Boundary

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8 Bird-Safe Building Presentation Dr Chris Sheppard original pdf

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Real Birds! We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Birds Have Intrinsic and Cultural Value We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Birds Contribute Hundreds of Billions in Eco-services Habitat Restoration Pest Control Bird Watching: 40+ Billion Dollar Economic Engine Collisions are not rare We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Annual Mortality: North America We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Mortality estimate Date of reference Collisions with Buildings/glass 2014 1 billion Cats 2013 2—4 billion Most Collisions are on Homes and Low-rise Buildings, not Highrises We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. The Bird Activity Zone Mostly Songbirds: migrating at night, colliding by day – WHY? We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Look Where You’re Going? What Causes Collisions? Glass or No Glass? We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. Birds Take What They See Literally Birds Can’t Learn the Concept ‘Glass’ Open Sky vs Cluttered Environment How to Stop Collisions: Get Birds to Swerve By Using Bird-friendly Glass 2 or 3 D signals Proper Spacing -- 2” Visible from 10’ What’s Bird-friendly Glass? Evaluation Method #1: Tunnel Test – ‘active’ signals – Threat Factors Action! Fritted Glass, Surface Coverage 6%, TF= 17 Intuit HQ, Mountain View CA Google’s New Home at Block 185 is Downtown Austin’s Next Signature Tower James Rambin March 26, 2019 Comment Image: Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects / STG Design / Trammell Crow Company Block 185 is an all-star tower. This 35-floor office building by national developer Trammell Crow Company, UV Glass TF= 23 Vassar Bridge Science Building, Poughkeepsie Evaluation Method #2: Compliance with Prescriptive Standard ▪ Simple example: surface 1 etch, maximum gloss level =18 ▪ More complex: Flow Chart Insect Screen (not flush with glass) TF=1 Evaluation Method # 3:Spandrel Glass: visual scale Evaluation Method #4: Computer Models How to Design a Bird-friendly Building Strategies: Incorporate from the beginning ➢ Reduce exposure of glass ➢ Incorporate signals in/on glass ➢ Minimize use of glass Bird-friendly Design overlaps with: solar shading, glare control, distinctive design aesthetic, security, thermal control, energy efficiency and more Legislation, Ordinances and Guidelines We’re focused on overcoming the biggest problems facing birds today. IN PROGRESS Bird-safe Buildings Act, Federal State of California, CalGreen Berkeley Washington, DC DOEE Green Code State of Maryland Canada, standard code for provinces …

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8 American Bird Conservancy Model Bird-Friendly Building Guidelines original pdf

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American Bird Conservancy Model Bird-Friendly Building Guidelines December 2020 These model, or ideal, guidelines are intended to be a starting point for cities, towns, villages, counties, states, and any other entity interested in regulating or guiding building construction to reduce bird collisions with glass. They describe a truly bird-friendly building. Summarized simply, these guidelines are based on a 100/100/100 framework: 100% of all glass and other building materials should be bird friendly in the first 100 feet of 100% of buildings. The guidelines also specifically include all hazardous features that can trap birds or push them in the direction of dangerous features. Any group that adopts this ordinance as written will be at the leading edge of creating a bird- friendly built environment. However, many groups considering such guidelines will be interested in softening the language to exempt certain types of buildings or to reduce the amount of bird-friendly glass required. In anticipation of this, American Bird Conservancy (ABC) has created a discussion of the issues to be considered when revising the model guidelines. (See ABC’s Legislation, Ordinances, and Guidelines) These guidelines will be most commonly adopted as an ordinance to modify municipal building codes. As a result, the guidelines below are written in the form of a model ordinance. However, the text can be easily adapted to fit other building guidance formats. ABC will revise these guidelines as new science, materials, techniques, and technologies become available, so please make sure that you have the most current version before you begin the process of creating your own guidelines. (See ABC’s Legislation, Ordinances, and Guidelines) PROPOSAL NUMBER: SPONSOR(S): PROPOSAL NAME: Bird-Friendly Building Design Requirements PURPOSE: This building ordinance has been created to address the role of the (MUNICIPALITY)’s built environment in the annual loss of up to 1 billion birds due to glass collisions in the United States. WHEREAS, birds provide valuable and important ecological services, WHEREAS, (MUNICIPALITY) has recorded (XXX) species of resident and migratory bird species, WHEREAS, birding is a hobby enjoyed by 46 million Americans with an annual $107 billion total industry output in the United States, WHEREAS, as many as 1 billion birds may be killed by collisions with windows every year in the United States, WHEREAS, new buildings can be designed to reduce bird deaths from collisions without significant additional cost, WHEREAS there exist strategies to mitigate collisions on existing buildings, WHEREAS witnessing a collision is …

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8 Bird-safe Building Recommendation and Backup original pdf

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Backup Materials: Animal Advisory Commission Meeting Agenda Item #8, October 10, 2022 Bird-safe Building Guidelines Proposed Animal Advisory Commission Recommendation: The Animal Advisory Commission recommends that the Austin City Council adopts the American Bird Conservancy’s Model-Friendly Building Guidelines for the City of Austin. We further recommend that the Austin City Council writes a letter to the US Congress to recommend support for the Federal Bird Safe Buildings Act of 2021. Current Legislation: New York City: http://nyc.legistar1.com/nyc/attachments/7da57cbb-679b-45c9-bc5a-058e49c42c24.pdf Madison, Wisconsin: https://madison.legistar.com/ViewReport.http://nyc.legistar1.com/nyc/attachments/7da57cbb- 679b-45c9-bc5a- 058e49c42c24.pdf?M=R&N=Text&GID=205&ID=4026260&GUID=B7D2A103-B19F-4F20- 96F2-14A2E27FD393&Title=Legislation+Text Chicago, Illinois: https://chicago.councilmatic.org/legislation/o2020-136/ Pending Federal Legislation for public buildings: https://www.congress.gov/bill/117th-congress/house-bill/1986/text?r=3&s=1

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Oct. 10, 2022

11 Letter to City Hall re SD 28 original pdf

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Agenda Item 11: ASO and City of Austin Strategic Development Plan Animal Advisory Commission October 10, 2022 Letter to Austin CM and CFO concerning SD28 Dear City Manager Spencer Cronk and Chief Financial Officer Ed Van Eenoo: We recommend that the City of Austin include information about the Austin Animal Center and our many programs for Austin citizens in the upcoming Strategic Development 28 Plan (SD28). The Animal Advisory Commission, as well as Austin Animal Center leadership and staff, were disappointed when no mention was made of Austin’s Animal Center and our many valuable programs for helping Austin’s animals in the last Strategic Development Plan. There is a tremendous amount of hard work done every day of the year for the animals of Austin by Shelter Staff, supported by the hard work of many Austin citizens who volunteer their time and donate their money to help make the lives of Austin’s companion animals better. This extends out to our many Austin Partner Organizations, all of which contribute to our goal of the best No-Kill Shelter in the world. It is an unfortunate omission that such hard work on such an important City function is lacking from a Strategic Plan for our City. Animals are family to many Austin residents - let us be more inclusive in the upcoming Austin Strategic Plan! Thank you for your attention to this matter. Sincerely, Dr. Craig Nazor Chair, Animal Advisory Commission

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Oct. 10, 2022

2 September 2022 Animal Services Report original pdf

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September 2022 September 2022 Animal Services Report AUSTIN ANIMAL SERVICES REPORT • Austin Animal Center restricted intake to emergencies effective September 13. • Austin Animal Center reopened for adoption and reclaim on Sundays beginning September 25. • The live outcome rate for September was 97.68 percent. • A total of 747 animals were brought to the shelter which included 398 dogs, 309 cats, 25 wild animals, four guinea pigs, three rabbits, three domestic birds, one snake, and one tortoise. • A total of 698 animals were adopted (356 dogs, 323 cats, and 19 small pets). • A total of 93 dogs, cats, and tortoise were returned to their owners (RTOs and RTO-Adopt). • Animal Protection Officers (APOs) returned 49 animals to their owners in the field. • Officers handed out 26 fencing assistance applications and implanted zero microchips. • Officers impounded 172 injured animals and delivered 158 wildlife animals to Austin Wildlife Rescue. • Officers entered 212 rabies exposure reports and submitted 29 specimens for rabies testing. Four bats tested Animal Services News Animal Protection positive for rabies. • 31 total coyote related activities o 12 sightings o 5 incidents o 3 wild speaks o 3 wild sicks o 3 wild injured o 3 observations o 2 encounters • Out of 31 coyote related activities, 19 fell within the reported behavior types (sighting, encounter, and incident) • Encounters: Pets were a factor in 100% of activities: o 1 encounter involved a coyote entering a fenced backyard to chase two outside cats Incidents: Pets were factor in 100% of these encounters. • September 2022 Animal Services Report o 1 incident involved a coyote family of 4 entering a backyard. One growled at a resident o 1 incident involved a coyote taking an off-leash dog with owner nearby o 1 incident involved a coyote chasing an off leash outside cat with owner next to the cat o 1 incident involved a coyote taking an outside cat. Unknown if it was owned. • Out of 31 related activities, 9 fell within the reported behavior types (wild sick, wild speak, and wild injured) Volunteer, Foster, and Rescue Programs • A total of 316 volunteers donated 4,519 hours of volunteer service. • The Volunteer Coordinators held five orientations for new volunteers, introducing 126 people to the shelter programs. 109 new volunteers attended their first training or mentor shifts in September. • 68 individuals donated 136 …

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Oct. 10, 2022

7 Commission Recommendation re Congress Ave Bridge Bat Colony original pdf

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We recommend that the dysfunctional string of lights on the western side of the Congress Agenda Item 7 Backup: Congress Avenue Bat Colony Animal Advisory Commission October 10, 2022 The Animal Advisory Commission makes the following recommendations concerning the Mexican Free-tail bat colony under the Congress Ave. bridge: We recommend that the City of Austin posts a QR code prominently on the east side of 1. both ends of the Congress Ave. bridge, scannable by a smart phone, that links to a City website where detailed information about Austin’s bat colony can be provided. This website should contain information about bat viewing opportunities, safety around bats, and what to do about injured bats. We further recommend that for detailed biological and historical information about these Austin bats, including seasonal cycles that affect viewing opportunities, bat behavior, and the ecological significance of this colony, the City site should be linked to a site specifically designed and frequently updated for this detailed information by Merlin Tuttle’s Bat Conservation (MTBC). 2. Ave. bridge be removed. This structure is a hazard to bats, particularly young bats, as they start their nightly flights for food. 3. placement of any publicly accessible bat-viewing areas being considered. We recommend that as soon as The Statesman PUD plans become finalized and the 4. positioning of any proposed bat-viewing areas or decks has been determined, the City judiciously trims some of the trees along Lady Bird Lake for better public bat-viewing. Trees do not need to be removed, but some of the lower branches could be trimmed for better sight lines, depending on the location of the bat-viewing areas. 5. bridge. These joints are above land. (The spaces have been cemented closed above the Hike and Bike trail.) Vegetation beneath the bats’ south-end roosting spaces should not be permitted to grow more than one meter tall. (Bats will abandon this area if vegetation is permitted to grow taller.) A more sophisticated planting could also be designed for this area, as tall vegetation beneath the bridge that interferes with the bats demands more maintenance. We believe this is a project best handled by a collaboration between the Watershed Protection Department and the Austin Trail Conservancy. 6. and into Lady Bird Lake. Currently, there is erosion damage to the Trail itself from this stormwater flow. There is a need for some kind of rainwater detention structure to be built on the …

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