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Dec. 2, 2020

Online Town Hall on Disability and Policing in Austin original pdf

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Human Rights Commission Community Interest Announcement Online Town Hall on Disability and Policing in Austin Join our virtual event that centers the experiences of people with disabilities and their lived experiences in Austin, Texas. Event sponsored by Mayor Steve Adler, Office of Police Oversight, Equity Office, and the Mayor's Committee for People with Disabilities. Accommodations available. Please contact either David Ondich david.ondich@austintexas.gov or Lee Nguyen lee.ngyuen@austintexas.gov Wednesday, December 2, 2020 6:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Via Videoconference http://bit.ly/2HaMdG6 A quorum of commission members may be present. No action will be taken. For more information, please contact the commission’s staff liaison, Jonathan Babiak, at (512) 974-3203 or by email at Jonathan.Babiak@austintexas.gov.

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Nov. 16, 2020

Location: Via Videoconferencing original pdf

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November 16, 2020 Regular Meeting of the Human Rights Commission Human Rights Commission to be held November 16, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance (Sunday, November 15, 2020 by Noon). All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the November 16, 2020 Human Rights Commission Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison at (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov no later than noon, Sunday, November 15, 2020 (the day before the meeting). The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. •If this meeting is broadcast live, residents may watch the meeting here: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch- atxn-live Reunión del Human Rights Commission FECHA de la reunion (November 16, 2020) La junta se llevará con modificaciones de distanciamiento social Se permitirán comentarios públicos por teléfono; no se permitirá ninguna entrada en persona. Todos los oradores deben registrarse con anticipación (November 15, 2020 antes del mediodía). Todos los comentarios públicos se producirán al comienzo de la reunión. Para hablar de forma remota en la reunión, los residentes deben: • Llame o envíe un correo electrónico al enlace de (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov a más tardar al mediodía (el día antes de la reunión). La información requerida es el nombre del orador, los números de artículo sobre los que desean hablar, si están a favor / en contra / neutrales, y un número de teléfono o dirección de correo electrónico. • Una vez que se haya llamado o enviado por correo electrónico una solicitud para hablar al enlace de la junta, los residentes recibirán …

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Nov. 16, 2020

20201116 002a Human Rights Day Proclamation DRAFT original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Human Rights Commission Austin, Texas Recommendation 20201116-002a: Designating December 10, 2020 as Human Rights Day in Whereas, Nelson Mandela said, “To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity;” and Whereas, more than 75,000,000 Americans chose a new direction for our country in our recent national election, one in which the issue of human rights will be given the emphasis it deserves; and Whereas, our federal government cannot locate the parents of over 500 immigrant children because of horrendous policies put into place by the current Administration; and Whereas, poverty, slavery, torture, and human trafficking are still in existence; and Whereas, Human Rights Day is the day in 1948 the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; and Whereas, the formal inception of Human Rights Day dates from 1950, after the U.N. Assembly passed resolution 423(V) inviting all nations and interested organizations to adopt December 10 of each year as Human Rights Day; Therefore, be it resolved, that the Austin City Council proclaim December 10, 2020 as Human Rights Day in Austin, Texas. Date of Approval: _____________________________ Record of the vote: Attest: _____________________________________________

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Nov. 16, 2020

Backup original pdf

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REGULAR MEETING MONDAY, October 26, 2020 HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION MINUTES The Human Rights Commission convened in a regular meeting on Monday, October 26, 2020 via teleconference in Austin, Texas. Chair Sareta Davis called the Board Meeting to order at 5:32 p.m. Board Members in Attendance: Chair Davis, Vice Chair Jamarr Brown, Commissioner Breckenridge, Commissioner Garry Brown, Commissioner Caballero, Commissioner Casas, Commissioner Museitif, Commissioner Santana, Commissioner Weigel, and Commissioner White. Staff in Attendance: Jonathan Babiak, Human Resources Coordinator, Human Resources Department 1. APPROVAL OF MINUTES a. The minutes from the regular meeting of October 2, 2020 were approved on a vote of 6-0: Chair Davis motion, Commissioner Caballero second. Voting in favor were Chair Davis, Commissioner Garry Brown, Commissioner Caballero, Commissioner Casas, Commissioner Museitif, and Commissioner White. Vice Chair Jamarr Brown, Commissioner Breckenridge, Commissioner Griffith, Commissioner Santana, and Commissioner Weigel were absent. 2. NEW BUSINESS a. Discussion and possible action on a Recommendation for continued funding for the Hotel Safety Net and Resources for Victims of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking in Austin/Travis County. (Davis/Santana) The Commission discussed this item. Chair Davis moved for adoption, Commissioner Garry Brown second. The recommendation was adopted on a vote of 9-0. Voting in favor were Chair Davis, Vice Chair Jamarr Brown, Commissioner Garry Brown, Commissioner Caballero, Commissioner Casas, Commissioner Museitif, Commissioner Santana, Commissioner Weigel, and Commissioner White. Commissioner Breckenridge and Commissioner Griffith were absent. b. Discussion and possible action on a Recommendation regarding Black Quality of Life Declaration. (Davis/Santana) The Commission discussed this item. Chair Davis moved for adoption, Vice Chair Jamarr Brown and Commissioner Santana second. The recommendation was adopted on a vote of 10-0. Voting in favor were Chair Davis, Vice Chair Jamarr Brown, Commissioner Breckenridge, Commissioner Garry Brown, Commissioner Caballero, Commissioner Casas, Commissioner Museitif, Commissioner Santana, Commissioner Weigel, and Commissioner White. Commissioner Griffith was absent. 1 c. Discussion and possible action on a Recommendation regarding Block 16 and Block 18 African American Cultural Space. (Davis/Santana) The Commission discussed this item. Chair Davis moved for adoption, Commissioner Santana second. The recommendation was adopted on a vote of 10-0. Voting in favor were Chair Davis, Vice Chair Jamarr Brown, Commissioner Breckenridge, Commissioner Garry Brown, Commissioner Caballero, Commissioner Casas, Commissioner Museitif, Commissioner Santana, Commissioner Weigel, and Commissioner White. Commissioner Griffith was absent. d. Discussion and possible action on a Recommendation regarding Black Arts and the Cultural District in Austin. (Davis/Santana) The Commission …

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Oct. 26, 2020

Location: Via Videoconferencing original pdf

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October 26, 2020 Regular Meeting of the Human Rights Commission Human Rights Commission to be held October 26, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance (Sunday, October 25, 2020 by Noon). All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the October 26, 2020 Human Rights Commission Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison at (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov no later than noon, Sunday, October 25, 2020 (the day before the meeting). The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. •If this meeting is broadcast live, residents may watch the meeting here: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch- atxn-live Reunión del Human Rights Commission FECHA de la reunion (October 26, 2020) La junta se llevará con modificaciones de distanciamiento social Se permitirán comentarios públicos por teléfono; no se permitirá ninguna entrada en persona. Todos los oradores deben registrarse con anticipación (October 25, 2020 antes del mediodía). Todos los comentarios públicos se producirán al comienzo de la reunión. Para hablar de forma remota en la reunión, los residentes deben: • Llame o envíe un correo electrónico al enlace de (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov a más tardar al mediodía (el día antes de la reunión). La información requerida es el nombre del orador, los números de artículo sobre los que desean hablar, si están a favor / en contra / neutrales, y un número de teléfono o dirección de correo electrónico. • Una vez que se haya llamado o enviado por correo electrónico una solicitud para hablar al enlace de la junta, los residentes recibirán …

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Oct. 26, 2020

20201026 2a Hotel Safety Net Victims of Domestic Violence DRAFT original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Human Rights Commission Recommendation 20201026-002a Continued Funding for the Hotel Safety Net for survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, and Human Trafficking WHEREAS, the many victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, find themselves displaced and homeless during the COVID-19 pandemic, WHEREAS, during the COVID-19 pandemic, previously full local emergency shelters serving victims; have had to cut their capacity to less than half to avoid infection risk and to ensure the safety of their staff and current residents, WHEREAS, during the COVID-19 pandemic, calls to the COVID-19 Domestic Violence emergency response hotline has increased by 233% since its inception in April 2020, WHEREAS, local law enforcement agencies are now able to place domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking agencies into immediate connection with housing and to provide food access and immediate incidentals for displaced and now homeless victims who have been turned away due to lessened emergency shelter capacity and long waitlists; WHEREAS, local hotels across the city of Austin/Travis County and in the surrounding counties have built a “safety net” of hotels throughout the city for these displaced and now homeless victims as they transition out of their violence; WHEREAS, these victims will now face chronic homelessness, food insecurity, increased unemployment, and the lack of safety and stability that comes with have an address; WHEREAS, before the COVID-19 pandemic, 48% of those victims leaving their violence were being turned away from local shelters and now nearly 90% is being turned away per a 2019-2020 HHSE report from The Texas Council on Family Violence; WHEREAS, domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking should be considered public health concerns and become a permanent consideration for funding resources after the COVID-19 pandemic is deemed over; WHEREAS, There is still a very high demand for the hotel safety net, resources and services provided during to the victims seeking support during COVID-19; NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF AUSTIN: 1) Implore City Council and the City Manager to continue funding the hotel safety net and resources for victims experiencing domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking. The funding to this NOW ESSENTIAL and RELIED UPON Program going forward, will nurture the trust and relationship between local law enforcement, local referring agencies, and the victims themselves. The Hotel Safety Net has grown to 40 local hotels, providing them revenue to keep their doors …

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Oct. 26, 2020

20201026 2b Black Quality of Life Declaration DRAFT original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION The City of Austin Human Rights Commission Recommendation 20201026-002b : Black Quality of Life Declaration - October 2020 WHEREAS, the African American Resource Advisory Commission (“the Commission”) is authorized by Austin City Codes: 2-1-101 to advise the City Council on issues related to the quality of life for the City’s African American community; and WHEREAS, the Commission is specifically authorized to recommend programs designed to alleviate any inequities that may confront African Americans in social, economic, and vocational pursuits, including (1) health care, (2) housing, including affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness, (3) entertainment opportunities for professionals and students, (4) employment, (5) cultural venues, including museums, theaters, art galleries, and music venues, and (6) Public Safety; and WHEREAS, on October 27, 2005 the City Council approved the African American Quality of Life Initiative; and WHEREAS, under the Arts, Culture, and Entertainment Recommendation from the African American Quality of Life Initiative, a need for an African American Cultural Heritage District was recognized to enhance the quality of life for African Americans; and WHEREAS, City staff has worked closely with numerous Cultural Arts organizations within the City to determine this area meets the District's criteria; and WHEREAS, the City of Austin has detailed Strategic Direction 2023 to “strive to create a complete community where every Austinite has choices at every stage of life that allow us to experience and contribute to the following outcomes: Economic Opportunities, Mobility, Safety, Health and Environment, Culture and Life-long learning, and Government that Works for “All of Us”; and WHEREAS, City Council’s adoption of the 1928 Master Plan required African Americans to relocate to the “Negro District” in order to receive basic City services, this plan strategically and systematically, along with additional ordinances that were adopted to ensure full compliance with the segregated 1928 Master Plan, and thus the lives of African Americans have been severely impacted socially and economically by years of intentional and systemic racism due to the implementation of the 1928 Master Plan; and WHEREAS, March 2017, the Mayor’s Task Force issued a report on Institutional Racism and Systemic Inequities that is inclusive of a list of recommendations aimed at the dismantling of institutional racism and systemic inequities in the City of Austin and the Austin region; and WHEREAS, In support of Resolution No. 20180215-082 we also ask the City Manager to, among other things, analyze and provide next steps for collaboration …

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Oct. 26, 2020

20201026 2c Block 16 and Block 18 African American Cultural Space Recommendation DRAFT original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION The City of Austin Human Rights Commission Recommendation: Block 16 and Block 18 African American Cultural Space WHEREAS, the African American Resource Advisory Commission (“the Commission”) is authorized by Austin City Codes: 2-1-101 to advise the City Council on issues related to the quality of life for the City’s African American community; and WHEREAS, the Commission is specifically authorized to recommend programs designed to alleviate any inequities that may confront African Americans in social, economic, and vocational pursuits, including (1) health care, (2) housing, including affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness, (3) entertainment opportunities for professionals and students, (4) employment, (5) cultural venues, including museums, theaters, art galleries, and music venues, and (6) Public Safety; and WHEREAS, the African American Resource Advisory Commission supports the African American Cultural Heritage District Investment Initiative; and WHEREAS, on October 27, 2005 the City Council approved the African American Quality of Life Initiative; and WHEREAS, under the Arts, Culture, and Entertainment Recommendation from the African American Quality of Life Initiative, a need for an African American Cultural Heritage District was recognized to enhance the quality of life for African Americans; and WHEREAS, City staff has worked closely with numerous Cultural Arts organizations within the City to determine this area meets the District's criteria; and WHEREAS, the City of Austin has detailed Strategic Direction 2023 to “strive to create a complete community where every Austinite has choices at every stage of life that allow us to experience and contribute to all of the following outcomes: Economic Opportunities, Mobility, Safety, Health and Environment, Culture and Life-long learning, and a Government that Works for “All of Us”; and WHEREAS, City Council adoption of the 1928 Master Plan required African Americans to relocate to the “Negro District” in order to receive basic City services, this plan strategically and systematically, along with additional ordinances were adopted to ensure full compliance with the segregated 1928 Master Plan, and the lives of African Americans have been severely impacted socially and economically by years of intentional and systemic racism due to the implementation of the 1928 Master Plan; and WHEREAS, In support of Resolution No. 20180215-082 we also ask the City Manager to, among other things, analyze and provide next steps for collaboration and support of an “Austin Cultural Trust” that could create spaces that support artists and arts organizations, preserve historic and iconic cultural buildings and spaces for creative …

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Oct. 26, 2020

20201026 2d Black Arts and Cultural District DRAFT original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION The City of Austin Human Rights Commission Recommendation 20201026-002d: Black Arts and Cultural District Recommendation WHEREAS, the African American Resource Advisory Commission (“the Commission”) is authorized by Austin City Codes: 2-1-101 to advise the City Council on issues related to the quality of life for the City’s African American community; and WHEREAS, the Commission is specifically authorized to recommend programs designed to alleviate any inequities that may confront African Americans in social, economic, and vocational pursuits, including (1) health care, (2) housing, including affordable housing, home ownership, and homelessness, (3) entertainment opportunities for professionals and students (4) employment, (5) cultural venues, including museums, theaters, art galleries, and music venues, and (6) Public Safety; and WHEREAS, on October 27, 2005 the City Council approved the African American Quality of Life Initiative; and WHEREAS, under the Arts, Culture, and Entertainment Recommendation from the African American Quality of Life Initiative, a need for an African American Cultural Heritage District (AACHD) was recognized to enhance the quality of life for African Americans; and WHEREAS, African American historic landmarks represent only 47 of the 629 historical landmarks in the City of Austin and City staff have worked closely with numerous Cultural Arts organizations within the city to determine the African American Cultural Heritage District meets the City of Austin's criteria; and WHEREAS, the City of Austin has detailed Strategic Direction 2023 to “strive to create a complete community where every Austinite has choices at every stage of life that allow us to experience and contribute to all of the following outcomes: Economic Opportunities, Mobility, Safety, Health and Environment, Culture and Life-long learning, and Government that Works for “All of Us”; and WHEREAS, March 2017, the Mayor’s Task Force issued a report on Institutional Racism and Systemic Inequities that is inclusive of a list of recommendations aimed at the dismantling of institutional racism and systemic inequities in the City of Austin and the Austin region; and WHEREAS, African Americans account for 8% of the population in Travis County, 13% of African Americans live below the poverty line, 34% of the homeless population are African Americans and 25% of those serving sentences in Travis County Jail are African American men and women. In addition, 34% of children in low income homes do not receive any learning support services while African American children make up 90% of children in low income homes; and WHEREAS, on August …

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Oct. 26, 2020

20201026-02a: Hotel Safety Net Victims of Domestic Violence original pdf

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BOARD/COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Human Rights Commission Recommendation 20201026-002a and Human Trafficking Continued Funding for the Hotel Safety Net for survivors of Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault, WHEREAS, the many victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, find themselves displaced and homeless during the COVID-19 pandemic, WHEREAS, during the COVID-19 pandemic, previously full local emergency shelters serving victims; have had to cut their capacity to less than half to avoid infection risk and to ensure the safety of their staff and current residents, WHEREAS, during the COVID-19 pandemic, calls to the COVID-19 Domestic Violence emergency response hotline has increased by 233% since its inception in April 2020, WHEREAS, local law enforcement agencies are now able to place domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking agencies into immediate connection with housing and to provide food access and immediate incidentals for displaced and now homeless victims who have been turned away due to lessened emergency shelter capacity and long waitlists; WHEREAS, local hotels across the city of Austin/Travis County and in the surrounding counties have built a “safety net” of hotels throughout the city for these displaced and now homeless victims as they transition out of their violence; WHEREAS, these victims will now face chronic homelessness, food insecurity, increased unemployment, and the lack of safety and stability that comes with have an address; WHEREAS, before the COVID-19 pandemic, 48% of those victims leaving their violence were being turned away from local shelters and now nearly 90% is being turned away per a 2019-2020 HHSE report from The Texas Council on Family Violence; WHEREAS, domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking should be considered public health concerns and become a permanent consideration for funding resources after the COVID-19 pandemic is deemed over; WHEREAS, There is still a very high demand for the hotel safety net, resources and services provided during to the victims seeking support during COVID-19;

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Oct. 26, 2020

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Oct. 20, 2020

City-Community Reimagining Public Safety Task Force original pdf

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Human Rights Commission Community Interest Announcement Austin City-Community Reimagining Public Safety Task Force Tuesday, October 20, 2020 6:00 p.m. Via Videoconference Passcode: RPSTskFrc https://zoom.us/j/98869363824?pwd=TEUrMk9zb1dEQmRweVlCVG84cEU5UT09 Please click the link below to join the webinar: A quorum of commission members may be present. No action will be taken. For more information, please contact the commission’s staff liaison, Jonathan Babiak, at (512) 974-3203 or by email at Jonathan.Babiak@austintexas.gov.

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Oct. 2, 2020

Location: Via Videoconferencing original pdf

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October 2, 2020 Regular Meeting of the Human Rights Commission Human Rights Commission to be held October 2, 2020 with Social Distancing Modifications Public comment will be allowed via telephone; no in-person input will be allowed. All speakers must register in advance (Thursday, October 1, 2020 by Noon). All public comment will occur at the beginning of the meeting. To speak remotely at the October 2, 2020 Human Rights Commission Meeting, residents must: •Call or email the board liaison at (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov no later than noon, Thursday, October 1, 2020 (the day before the meeting). The information required is the speaker name, item number(s) they wish to speak on, whether they are for/against/neutral, and a telephone number or email address. •Once a request to speak has been called in or emailed to the board liaison, residents will receive either an email or phone call providing the telephone number to call on the day of the scheduled meeting. •Speakers must call in at least 15 minutes prior to meeting start in order to speak, late callers will not be accepted and will not be able to speak. •Speakers will be placed in a queue until their time to speak. •Handouts or other information may be emailed to jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov by Noon the day before the scheduled meeting. This information will be provided to Board and Commission members in advance of the meeting. •If this meeting is broadcast live, residents may watch the meeting here: http://www.austintexas.gov/page/watch- atxn-live Reunión del Human Rights Commission FECHA de la reunion (October 2, 2020) La junta se llevará con modificaciones de distanciamiento social Se permitirán comentarios públicos por teléfono; no se permitirá ninguna entrada en persona. Todos los oradores deben registrarse con anticipación (October 1, 2020 antes del mediodía). Todos los comentarios públicos se producirán al comienzo de la reunión. Para hablar de forma remota en la reunión, los residentes deben: • Llame o envíe un correo electrónico al enlace de (512) 974-3276 or jonathan.babiak@austintexas.gov a más tardar al mediodía (el día antes de la reunión). La información requerida es el nombre del orador, los números de artículo sobre los que desean hablar, si están a favor / en contra / neutrales, y un número de teléfono o dirección de correo electrónico. • Una vez que se haya llamado o enviado por correo electrónico una solicitud para hablar al enlace de la junta, los residentes recibirán …

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Oct. 2, 2020

20201002-002c 87th Legislative Agenda original pdf

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87TH STATE LEGISLATIVE AGENDA Intergovernmental Relations Office – Brie L. Franco, Officer TEXAS LEGISLATURE INCREASINGLY FOCUSED ON CITIES Total Bills Introduced Total Bills Passed City-Related bills introduced City-Related bills passed Year 76th-1999 77th-2001 78th-2003 79th-2005 80th-2007 81st-2009 82nd-2011 83rd-2013 84th-2015 85th – 2017 5,813 5,612 5,633 5,512 6,241 7,464 5,938 5,950 6,476 6,800 1,622 1,601 1,384 1,389 1,481 1,459 1,379 1,437 1,329 1,208 1,230+ 1,200+ 1,200+ 1,200+ 1,200+ 1,500+ 1,500+ 1,900+ 1,900+ 2,500+ 86th – 2019 7,324 1,429 2,300+ 130+ 150+ 110+ 105+ 120+ 120+ 160+ 220+ 220+ 294 338 • 54 % more City- related bills were passed between 2015 and 2019 • 182 % more City – related bills were passed between 2009 and 2019 10/1/2020 87th Legislative Agenda 2 LEGISLATIVE SESSION: IGRO ROLE In the 86th session • 3,970 Bills/JR’s were filed in last 10 business days before filing deadline, March 8th. (54%). • 7,324 bills read and analyzed by IGRO. • Over 2,500 bills were determined by IGRO to affect cities. • 1,296 Bills/JR’s required analysis/action by departments and IGRO. 10/1/2020 87th Legislative Agenda 3 TREND: ANTI-CITY TONE: GOVERNOR ABBOTT "As opposed to the state having to take multiple rifle- shot approaches at overriding local regulations, I think a broad-based law by the state of Texas that says across the board, the state is going to pre-empt local regulations, is a superior approach“ * – Governor Greg Abbott, March 21, 2017 *Source: “Abbott wants "broad-based law" that pre-empts local regulations” Texas Tribune, March 21, 2017 Governor Greg Abbott in 2017 10/1/2020 87th Legislative Agenda 4 TREND: ANTI-CITY LEGISLATION: POST 85TH SPECIAL SESSION "Our cities are still controlled by Democrats…And where do we have all our problems in America? Not at the state level run by Republicans, but in our cities that are mostly controlled by Democrat mayors and Democrat city council men and women. That's where you see liberal policies. That's where you see high taxes. That's where you see street crime." * -Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, 2017 *Source: “Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick blames city governments for "all our problems in America" Texas Tribune, AUG. 4, 2017 10/1/2020 87th Legislative Agenda 5 Lt Governor Dan Patrick in 2016. Photo by Gage Skidmore. TREND: ANTI-CITY TONE: POST 86TH SESSION “Any mayor, county judge that was dumb ass enough to come meet with me, I told them with great clarity, my goal is for this to be the …

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Oct. 2, 2020

20201002-002d Draft Climate Equity Plan original pdf

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2020 Austin Climate Equity Plan September 2020 Thank you for having us ● We’ve been revising the Community Climate Plan ● Draft for Public Comment out now ● Council in October/November ● We’re looking for your: ○ Comments ○ Areas of Interest ○ Pledge of Support 2 2015 Community Climate Plan Adopted by Council in June 2015 Electricity & Natural Gas Transportation & Land Use Materials & Waste Management 135 qualitative actions directed at departments 2017 Travis County Carbon Footprint 12.5 million metric tons carbon dioxide-equivalent Industrial Processes 3 How was this plan created? • 24 City Staff • 120 Community Members (NGO, Govt, Business) • 12 Ambassadors • 4 Equity Trainings • 5 Community Workshops (over 250 attendees) • 14 Steering Committee Meetings • 60+ Advisory Group Meetings • 50+ Interviews by Ambassadors 4 Steering Committee Members Co-Chairs Mayuri Raja, AZAAD, Google Shane Johnson, Sierra Club Katie Coyne, Asakura Robinson Susana Almanza, PODER Joep Meijer, Citizen Jim Walker, Univ. of Texas Rocio Villalobos, Equity Office Drew Nelson, Mitchell Foundation Rodrigo Leal, Navigant Consulting Rene Renteria, Citizen Kaiba White, Public Citizen Lauren Peressini, Sunrise Movement Shawanda Stewart, Huston-Tillotson Univ. Kenneth Thompson, Solar Austin Ben Leibowicz, Univ. of Texas Suzanne Russo, Pecan Street Inc. Pooja Sethi, Sethi Law Darien Clary, AISD Alberta Phillips, Joint Sustainability Committee, ECHO Also: Nakia Winfield, Brandi Clark Burton, Kurt Stogdill 5 Equity & Climate Health Hazards ● ● ● ● ● The Austin 1928 Master Plan divided the city along racial lines,forcibly displacing Blackresidents into specific, undesirable areas. The Tank Farm fuel storage facility, Eastside Landfill, and the Holly Power Plant exposed people of color to toxic pollution in East Austin neighborhoods. Gentrification is taking place in parts of the city where low-income people and people of color have been forced to live, the African-American share of the Austin population declined from 12% in 1990 to 7.7% in 2010. As of 2015, 52% of white Austin residents were homeowners, only 27% of African-American and 32% of Hispanic/Latinx residents owned homes. Cases of COVID-19, hospitalization and mortality rates are disproportionately affecting Latinx and Black communities 6 We are Changing the Earth’s Climate Warming over 2℃ could be catastrophic to life on earth 7 Climate Projections for Austin Low-income communities and communities of color are disproportionately affected by climate hazards ● Experience climate shocks on top of existing economic stressors ● Have less resources to bounce back from …

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Oct. 2, 2020

20201002-002e Guia de Information original pdf

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Our Future 35 (Nuestro Futuro 35) es una serie de participación destinada a impulsar el proceso de creación con una visión comunitaria para el recorrido de la I-35. TxDOT está enfocado en la reconstrucción de la I-35, la carretera actual. Ese proyecto se llama I-35 Capital Express Central (La Capital Express Central de la I-35). Our Future 35 (Nuestro Futuro 35) está enfocado en cómo orientar y aprovechar esta inversión importante para lograr resultados positivos para la comunidad Austin. GUÍA DE INFORMACIÓN ourfuture35.org VISIÓN SOBRE EL PROYECTO + HISTORIA VE + ESCUCHA 8/8 Community Conversation APRENDER ULI Urban Land Institute Report para llevar ¿Que es Our Future 35 (Nuestro Futuro 35)? En 1928, East Avenue se convirtió en la línea dividida entre la gente de color y los blancos mediante la adopción del Plan de 1928 y estableciendo las políticas racistas gobernando en NUESTRA ciudad. En los años 50, esta línea dividida, que una vez fue un lugar de reuniones comunitarias de todo tipo y color, se convirtió en la I-35, una barrera física que solidifica las prácticas y sistemas raciales y económicos que han plagado la evolución de Austin. Ahora que somos una de las ciudades grande más segregadas entre racial y económica del país, con una de las carreteras más congestionadas a través del centro de todo, toca desmantelar los sistemas y la infraestructura que nos trajeron aquí. Como primer paso en el proceso para crear una comunidad compartida visión para el futuro de la carretera, Downtown Austin Alliance contrató los servicios de asesoría nacional de Urban Land Institute (ULI). ULI trajo un panel de diversos expertos a Austin en febrero del año 2020, donde platicaron y trabajaron con la comunidad, reuniendo opiniones e ideas, y presentaron recomendaciones preliminares para el futuro de la I-35 en la Universidad Huston-Tillotson. ¿Cuáles han sido las conclusiones del reporte de Urban Land Institute? Basado en las entrevistas que el panel ha realizado y los numerosos reportes que han leído, el panel recomienda lo siguiente para nuestra nuevo proceso comunitario: Co-crear una visión para el futuro. Esto debe incluir una articulación de valores compartidos, como la equidad, así como también el compromiso de incorporar estos valores en todas las agencias, proyectos, y enfoques. Generar confianza entre todas las partes interesadas. Las injusticias históricas y la exclusión, intentos repetidos de actualizar la I-35 con estudios que no resultaron en cambios, y se han …

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Oct. 2, 2020

20201002-002e Our Future 35 Guide original pdf

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Our Future 35 is an engagement series intended to kick-start the process of co-creating a community vision for the I-35 corridor. TxDOT is focused on reconstructing I-35 – the actual roadway. That project is called I-35 Capital Express Central. Our Future 35 is focused on how to guide and leverage this major investment to achieve positive outcomes for the Austin community. INFO GUIDE ourfuture35.org CLICK TO WATCH + LISTEN 8/8 What is the history of I-35? And how was the project of Our Future 35 made? In 1928, East Avenue became the dividing line between People of Color and Whites through the adoption of the 1928 Plan and establishing racist governing policies in OUR city. In the 50s, this dividing line, once a place of community gatherings of all kinds and colors, became I-35, a physical barrier solidifying the racial and economic practices and systems that have plagued Austin’s evolution. Now that we are one of the most racially and economically segregated large cities in the country, with one of the most congested highways through the center of it, it’s time to dismantle the systems, and infrastructure, that got us here. Community Conversation As a first step in the process to create a shared community vision for the future of the corridor, the Downtown Austin Alliance engaged the Urban Land Institute’s (ULI) national advisory services. ULI brought a panel of diverse experts to Austin in February 2020, where they talked and worked with the community, gathering input and ideas, and presented preliminary recommendations for the future of I-35 at Huston-Tillotson University. LEARN ULI Urban Land Institute Report takeaways What have been the conclusions of the Urban Land Institute report? Based on the interviews the panel conducted and the many reports the panel read, the panel recommended the following for our new community process. Co-create a vision for the future. This should include an articulation of shared values, such as equity, as well as a commitment to incorporating these values across agencies, projects, and approaches. Build trust among all stakeholders. Historical injustices and exclusion, repeated attempts at updating I-35 with studies that did not result in change, and different growth priorities have led to distrust among stakeholder groups. It is critical that a community engagement process work to build trust as a precursor to building consensus (or agreement) on a path forward for the I-35 project. This can begin with naming …

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20201002-002e Our Future 35 presentation original pdf

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an engagement series intended to kick-start the process of co-creating a community vision for the I-35 corridor For the past decade, there has been talk about reconstructing I-35 through the heart of our city. And this year, TxDOT is advancing the planning process to make it happen. . y r a r b i L c i l b u P n i t s u A , r e t n e C y r o t s i H n i t s u A , c 4 9 5 7 3 - A C P I : T I D E R C With an infrastructure project of this scale, can we co-create a new process that deconstructs the racist, unjust policies of our past and centers our community's needs and desires to determine our own future? We’re designing a community call to action with a creative response. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity to shape a future that benefits all Austinites, especially Communities of Color most affected by I-35. Photo: Giulio Sciorio INTERACTIVE CREATIVE COLLECTIVE An engagement series that includes live and virtual broadcast, video, and participatory conversation. Poetry, music, art and animation as a way for the community to provide input. Compilation of mediums to express community’s collective values for our future I-35. The intent of the series aims to: EXPLORE CO-CREATING a new community-centered decision-making process IDENTIFY shared community values through the co-creation process ESTABLISH an equity framework for the vision based on our community's shared values BUILD THE FOUNDATION for the start of a new community coalition INFORM actions needed next; including community input to TxDOT's NEPA (environmental review) process Engagement Series*: Working Schedule SUMMER 2020 FALL 2020 WINTER 2020 SPRING 2021 Our Future 35 community organize values scoping Series Launch Community Q&A with KAZI 8/8 Episode 2 Co-Creation: Establishing Our Values 9/26 Episode 1 Healing and Futures Thinking: Facing the Past to Co-Create Our Future 8/22 Additional TBD Episode 3 Resilience: Values to Actions 10/24 *This series is a work in progress and will evolve through the community's participation. THE COMMUNITY MENTORS AND CREATIVE TEAM Shaping the content and experience of the series, the Community Mentors and Creative Team bring critical local knowledge and lived experience into the conversations. They will be joined each episode by national experts leading the way in equity-centered initiatives around the country. Dr. Colette Pierce …

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20201002-002g Decriminalize Psilocybin DRAFT original pdf

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COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION Human Rights Commission Possession and Use of Psilocybin Recommendation Number 20201002‐002g: Recommendation for City Council to Decriminalize WHEREAS, our community, in various ways, has expressed a desire to reimagine law enforcement in our city; and, WHEREAS; A 2010 Dutch study comparing 19 different illicit and/or recreational substances placed psilocybin lower on the list for addictive possibility than cannabis, alcohol, and tobacco; and, WHEREAS, A 2017 Johns Hopkins University study identifies psilocybin as a possible therapeutic for addiction, anxiety, and depression; including a possibility to aid in smoking cessation despite tobacco being recognized as possibly the most addictive substance for human consumption; and, WHEREAS, The municipalities of Denver, Colorado, Oakland, California, and Santa Cruz, California have already decriminalized the possession of psilocybin with little ill effects to report; and, WHEREAS, Brazil, Jamaica, The Netherlands, Samoa, have fully legalized possession and use while The British Virgin Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Greece, Italy, Portugal, and Spain have all decriminalized use and/or possession in some way; and, WHEREAS, The Drug War has been objectively one of the most negative policies for Black and Brown communities in the United States. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the Human Rights Commission of the City of Austin recommends the City Council of Austin pass an ordinance and/or legal framework which has the effect of decriminalizing possession and individual use of “magic mushrooms”/psilocybin. Date of Approval: _____________________________ Record of the vote: Attest: _____________________________________________

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Oct. 2, 2020

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